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[dm-devel] Re: IO scheduler based IO controller V10



On Fri, 25 Sep 2009 10:09:52 +0900
KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa hiroyu jp fujitsu com> wrote:

> On Thu, 24 Sep 2009 14:33:15 -0700
> Andrew Morton <akpm linux-foundation org> wrote:
> > > Test5 (Fairness for async writes, Buffered Write Vs Buffered Write)
> > > ===================================================================
> > > Fairness for async writes is tricky and biggest reason is that async writes
> > > are cached in higher layers (page cahe) as well as possibly in file system
> > > layer also (btrfs, xfs etc), and are dispatched to lower layers not necessarily
> > > in proportional manner.
> > > 
> > > For example, consider two dd threads reading /dev/zero as input file and doing
> > > writes of huge files. Very soon we will cross vm_dirty_ratio and dd thread will
> > > be forced to write out some pages to disk before more pages can be dirtied. But
> > > not necessarily dirty pages of same thread are picked. It can very well pick
> > > the inode of lesser priority dd thread and do some writeout. So effectively
> > > higher weight dd is doing writeouts of lower weight dd pages and we don't see
> > > service differentation.
> > > 
> > > IOW, the core problem with buffered write fairness is that higher weight thread
> > > does not throw enought IO traffic at IO controller to keep the queue
> > > continuously backlogged. In my testing, there are many .2 to .8 second
> > > intervals where higher weight queue is empty and in that duration lower weight
> > > queue get lots of job done giving the impression that there was no service
> > > differentiation.
> > > 
> > > In summary, from IO controller point of view async writes support is there.
> > > Because page cache has not been designed in such a manner that higher 
> > > prio/weight writer can do more write out as compared to lower prio/weight
> > > writer, gettting service differentiation is hard and it is visible in some
> > > cases and not visible in some cases.
> > 
> > Here's where it all falls to pieces.
> > 
> > For async writeback we just don't care about IO priorities.  Because
> > from the point of view of the userspace task, the write was async!  It
> > occurred at memory bandwidth speed.
> > 
> > It's only when the kernel's dirty memory thresholds start to get
> > exceeded that we start to care about prioritisation.  And at that time,
> > all dirty memory (within a memcg?) is equal - a high-ioprio dirty page
> > consumes just as much memory as a low-ioprio dirty page.
> > 
> > So when balance_dirty_pages() hits, what do we want to do?
> > 
> > I suppose that all we can do is to block low-ioprio processes more
> > agressively at the VFS layer, to reduce the rate at which they're
> > dirtying memory so as to give high-ioprio processes more of the disk
> > bandwidth.
> > 
> > But you've gone and implemented all of this stuff at the io-controller
> > level and not at the VFS level so you're, umm, screwed.
> > 
> 
> I think I must support dirty-ratio in memcg layer. But not yet.

OR...I'll add a bufferred-write-cgroup to track bufferred writebacks.
And add a control knob as
  bufferred_write.nr_dirty_thresh
to limit the number of dirty pages generetad via a cgroup.

Because memcg just records a owner of pages but not records who makes them
dirty, this may be better. Maybe I can reuse page_cgroup and Ryo's blockio
cgroup code.

But I'm not sure how I should treat I/Os generated out by kswapd.

Thanks,
-Kame


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