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Re: diehard processes



Use top as root and when it prompts for the number to use, try 2, 4 or as
a last resort, 9. If you use kill at a prompt, you would use them as -2,
-4 or -9. Each kill has a different level. -2 sends an interrupt on many
unix systems, as does -4. -9 is the big one, however, on some versions of
unix you could use -KILL to terminate the process which is more powerful
than -9.

If you are using database access, be careful with kill. You can corrupt
data if a table is locked and a subsequent process is waiting on the lock
and you kill the second as the first is releasing...

Karl L. Pearson
Senior uniVerse Database Analyst
Senior Unix/NT/Win Analyst
karlp colubs com

On Thu, 11 May 2000, Sebastiaan wrote:

-->Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 20:24:33 +0200 (METDST)
-->From: Sebastiaan <tw121164 elektron its tudelft nl>
-->Resent-from: redhat-install-list redhat com
-->Reply-To: redhat-install-list redhat com
-->To: redhat-install-list redhat com
-->Subject: diehard processes
-->
-->Hello,
-->
-->how can I kill processes which won't die with the normal termination
-->signal (15). Some processes crash, and I can not kill them, but they keep
-->eating processor and memory usage.
-->
-->Greetings,
-->Sebastiaan
-->
-->
-->
-->-- 
-->To unsubscribe: mail redhat-install-list-request redhat com with
-->"unsubscribe" as the Subject.
-->



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