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Re: New problems



Decide which source has the various information you need. ?Internal DNS server, Public DNS server, local hosts file. ?If your connecting to internal systems more than anything, then use the Internal DNS server. ?If the hosts you connect to are not registered in the Internal DNS server then you may need to create a /etc/hosts file with the static entries. ?The target system may need configuration tweaking too, if it is trying to resolve your host name when you connect. ?At any rate, you need to systematically sort through the requirements of your environment to best answer your question.

Hope this helps you.

Tom

Steve Wright wrote:
ok that seems to work, when I add the -n switch it comes back nice and fast.
And now for my next stupid question.
What should my DNS say and what file do I edit?
Thanks
Steve






-----Original Message-----
From: redhat-install-list-admin redhat com
[mailto:redhat-install-list-admin redhat com]On Behalf Of Rick Stevens
Sent: Thursday, August 15, 2002 3:08 PM
To: redhat-install-list redhat com
Subject: Re: New problems


Steve Wright wrote:
Hello All,
here is my problem.
I can ping out from my Linux machine, but it takes forever to show me the
first ping.
I can traceroute from my machine to my gateway and it shows only one hop,
but again it takes forever to come back with an answer.
I can ping the Linux machine from other machines in the network.
Everything seems to take forever and most often the time outs knock me
off.
I actually got the Linux machine to telnet to another machine on the
network, I logged in my user name but while waiting for the prompt to come
up for my password, I was thrown out.

I have no idea where to start looking for the problem, according to my
system admin, I am using all the correct network numbers.

Also while the telnet is trying to connect, the machine hangs, I have to
hard reboot to get out of it.

How do the pings behave if you specify "-n" (e.g. "ping -n ipaddress")?
If they're fast, then you have a DNS issue.

Normally, ping, telnet and the like pick up the IP address, then try
to do a reverse DNS lookup to find the name of the system. If your
DNS isn't set up right or is faulty, you'll have a big time delay
while all the DNS queries time out. Using "-n" on ping, traceroute,
tcpdump, etc. prevents the reverse DNS lookup.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
- Rick Stevens, Senior Systems Engineer rstevens vitalstream com -
- VitalStream, Inc. http://www.vitalstream.com -
- -
- I'm afraid my karma just ran over your d ogma -
----------------------------------------------------------------------



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