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Re: jumping into the installation process...how deep did you say it was?



Dear Jonathan,
I was absolutely at face value.
And I extremely appreciate your entire response.
 THANK YOU!


On Sunday 29 September 2002 09:37 pm, you wrote:
> >I'm a total newbie to Linux.  Please inform me of all the bad habits
> > formed in my MicroSoft past.  I need to get into the stride here.  Thanks
>
> Great idea! really. I hope you're not being sarcastic.
> I've been a newbie for about a month, and have made great strides.
> Here's my own list (please pardon some gross generalizations):
>
> - linux is largely a collection of programs, and corresponding
> configuration files. Branded versions are "distributions", which are
> repackaged builds of the standard code, perhaps with some added
> enhancements. What makes one distribution different from another is the
> pieces they choose to include or exclude.
>
> - generally, by default, linux installs with all security buttoned up
> tight. You need to explicitly enable connections, services, permissions,
> access, etc. This is directly opposite from Windows, which is generally
> configured to be open and you have to explicitly lock it up. This is a big
> reason why linux is considered secure while Windows is not. It is also a
> big source of frustration for new users who don't realize this polemic
> approach.
>
> - in linux (unix), everything is seen as a file from which data can be
> streamed in and/or out of: data files, executables, directories, drive
> partitions, modems, printers, keyboards, etc. (e.g. see /dev/ )
>
> - every system process is modular and reasonably independent. That means
> you can substitute any part of the system with alternatives. These
> alternatives may fit a particular need, interest, or fancy; and can be
> developed by anyone, anywhere, at any time.
>
> - each system process can be started, stopped, or restarted without ever
> having to reboot.
>
> - you can invoke system processes from the command line, from a gui, or
> automatically (on startup; in background as a "daemon").
>
> - command line control is very cool and powerful. GUI interfaces are very
> convenient and helpful. If behooves you to learn both ways of controlling
> any of the system services you are configuring.
>
> - you can change a process configuration by manually editing the config
> file, or with a gui to edit the conf file, or override settings with
> command line parameters. If you reconfigure something that?s currently
> running, you usually need to restart it.
>
> - sometimes values in a config file can override or be overridden by
> parameters in another related config file, so you may need to read up on
> what you?re doing.
>
> - you can start, stop and change system processes during the current
> session. You may need to separately set them up to "stick" when you reboot.
> And you may need to specify the boot level (e.g. 3=text mode, 5=X windows
> gui mode, each has it's own boot configuration).
>
> - every system service generates a log file, with more or less detail
> (configurable), so you can always dig in to discover why something is not
> working the way you expect it.
>
> - the linux open source world is "wonderful" because you can always find
> out, eventually, exactly how something works, whether clicking through docs
> or even drilling down to the source code.
>
> - unfortunately, it?s harder to drill ?up?, that is, to see a bigger
> picture, how things fit together. I believe this is the source of a lot of
> newbie confusion. For this, books seem a better source than the Web or
> manual pages.
>
> - also unfortunately, it seems you have to know a little about everything
> in order to know anything about anything in Linux. This is the source of
> alot of short responses from experienced people to newbie questions. A
> common one: RTFM, which really means, "you haven't suffered enough pain
> struggling to figure it out yourself so you don't deserve my answer (yet)".
>
> - regarding the transition from Windows to Linux, I look at it like a
> semi-permeable membrane, enclosing the microsoft world. As you struggle to
> pass through it, there's a world of people helping to pull you through. And
> once you make it across, you realize the freedom you've acquired.
>
> :)
>
> Jonathan.
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: redhat-install-list-admin redhat com
> [mailto:redhat-install-list-admin redhat com]On Behalf Of MapleLeaf
> Sent: Sunday, September 29, 2002 8:11 PM
> To: redhat-install-list redhat com
> Subject: Re: jumping into the installation process...how deep did you
> say it was?
>
> >I'm a total newbie to Linux.  Please inform me of all the bad habits
> > formed in my MicroSoft past.  I need to get into the stride here.  Thanks
>
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> Redhat-install-list redhat com
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