[Date Prev][Date Next]   [Thread Prev][Thread Next]   [Thread Index] [Date Index] [Author Index]

Re: advantage of partitions and RAID



Okay, I understand.

Two parts: why partition a disk?  and, how to manage a RAID filesystem
as it grows.

There are lots of reasons to segment your filesystem, but how should
depend on the uses you expect for the machine.  For a single-user box,
you might be able to get away with just / and swap if you really want
to, but I find that segmenting my filesystems gives me added flexibility
as my needs for the system change.

One advantage to having a separate /tmp and /var is that automatic
processes can sometimes go haywire and start spewing data to a disk.  If
/var is in its own partition, it can fill up without harming other
filesystems.  This matters less on Linux than on Solaris (where a full
/tmp can be a system crash under some circumstances) but I do it anyway.

If you have one partition which is extremely active (again, /var is a
good candidate if you're running databases or other heavily automated
processes) and you experience a system crash, it is possible that the
busy partition will be irreparable at boot time.  If that partition is
your whole disk, you're hurting worse than if it's a subset.

If the worst happens and you have to reinstall, reformatting your system
partitions won't touch your /home.

By having several different /boot and/or / partitions, it is possible to
run several different versions of the OS while keeping your
OS-independent data (like /home, maybe also parts of /usr, /var, etc)
unchanged.  Good for experimenting with new kernels, though I don't do
this so can't advise on particulars.

I could keep making stuff up but this is too long already.

As for the RAID stuff -- the particulars will depend upon how you're
doing RAID.  It might not be possible to add a device to the RAID
without reformatting the partition.  It might not be possible to add a
device without formatting _all_ partitions on the system.  Or, you might
be able to drop in the disk and see your filesystem magically grow on
the fly.  Depends upon your rig.  Are you doing RAID in hardware or
software?  Will you RAID all of your filesystems or only a subset?



IS wrote:
> 
> I mean besides the Linux native and swap partition for what reason should I
> make partitions for /boot /home /usr /var etc.
> 
> Once you setup the filesystem with all those partions what happens with the
> size of the filesystems when I add a new disk to my RAID array and expand
> the diskspace?
> 
> Regards,
> Ivo
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Michael R. Jinks" <mjinks saecos com>
> To: <redhat-list redhat com>
> Sent: Friday, April 13, 2001 4:51 PM
> Subject: Re: advantage of partitions and RAID
> 
> > Huh?  Partitions of what, the raw disks or the RAIDed meta-volume?
> >
> > Can you provide an example?
> >
> > IS wrote:
> > >
> > > What is the advantage of using partitions when RAID-5 is used?
> > >
> > > Regards,
> > > IS
> > >
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > Redhat-list mailing list
> > > Redhat-list redhat com
> > > https://listman.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
> >
> > --
> > ~~~Michael Jinks, IB // Technical Entity // Saecos Corporation~~~~
> > "We've done our best, but you're still hosed." -- W. Stearns, ISTS
> > Opinions expressed above are my own, and not those of my computer.
> >
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Redhat-list mailing list
> > Redhat-list redhat com
> > https://listman.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Redhat-list mailing list
> Redhat-list redhat com
> https://listman.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list

-- 
~~~Michael Jinks, IB // Technical Entity // Saecos Corporation~~~~
"We've done our best, but you're still hosed." -- W. Stearns, ISTS
Opinions expressed above are my own, and not those of my computer.





[Date Prev][Date Next]   [Thread Prev][Thread Next]   [Thread Index] [Date Index] [Author Index]