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Re: NetworkManager things



On Wed, 2007-07-04 at 15:43 -0600, Karl Larsen wrote:
> Mikkel L. Ellertson wrote:
> > Aaron Konstam wrote:
> >   
> >> On Wed, 2007-07-04 at 10:46 -0500, Mikkel L. Ellertson wrote:
> >>     
> >>> Aaron Konstam wrote:
> >>>       
> >>>> but to have them come on at boot run:
> >>>> chkconfig --level 35 NetworkManager on
> >>>> and
> >>>> chkconfig --level 35 NetworkManagerDispatcher on
> >>>>
> >>>>         
> >>> You may want to skip the --level 35 option. If you do not specify
> >>> the levels, then the default of 2 through 5 are used, unless
> >>> overridden by the setting in the service control script. From "man
> >>> chkconfig:
> >>>
> >>> By default, the on and off options affect only runlevels 2, 3, 4,
> >>> and 5, while reset affects all of the runlevels.  The --level option
> >>> may be used to specify which runlevels are affected.
> >>>       
> >> What you say is true but that is not the organized way to do things.
> >> Most people who have never been in level 2 or 4 would only be confused
> >> by your system.
> >>
> >>     
> > It is not my system - it is the way all the init scripts are handled
> > on RedHat, Fedora, and any other distribution that uses the
> > initscripts package to implement System V style system
> > initialization. By specifying the run levels that a program should
> > run at by default, and by specifying when they should start and
> > stop, the user does not have to know the details of how the programs
> > interact. Things are set up for them without them having to worry
> > about it.
> >
> > I do not see how running "chlconfg NetworkManagerDispatcher on"
> > instead of "chkconfig --level 35 NetworkManagerDispatcher on" would
> > confuse people. Having things set properly for the run levels that
> > they do not normally use is a bonus - if they end up using them in
> > troubleshooting, things are already set up for them without them
> > having to think about it.
> >
> > Mikkel
> >   
>     This whole thing is quite confusing. If I go to the 
> /etc/rc.d/init.d/ directory and just do # ./NetworkManager it gives me 
> this line:
> 
> Usage: ./NetworkManager {start|stop|status|restart|condrestart}
> 
> I can follow the call with any of 5 verbs. I did a ./NetworkManager 
> status and that got:
> 
> [root localhost init.d]# ./NetworkManager status
> NetworkManager is stopped
> 
> That is very clear. Then I used chkconfig NetworkManager on and then 
> checked it:
> 
> [root localhost init.d]# chkconfig NetworkManager on
> [root localhost init.d]# ./NetworkManager status
> NetworkManager is stopped
> 
> This must mean that the application is still stopped BUT it will be 
> started with the next boot.  Confusing.
> 
> Karl
> 
Thatis the way it works. If you want to start it right now execute:
services NetworkManager start
--
=======================================================================
"But Huey, you PROMISED!" "Tell 'em I lied."
=======================================================================
Aaron Konstam telephone: (210) 656-0355 e-mail: akonstam sbcglobal net


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