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Re: What is filesystem panic?



Per Anton Rønning wrote:
Rick Stevens wrote:
Per Anton Rønning wrote:
Rick Stevens wrote:
Per Anton Rønning wrote:
Mikkel L. Ellertson wrote:
Per Anton Rønning wrote:
Mikkel L. Ellertson wrote:
Double check that you are accessing the correct device. USB drives
do not always get "assigned" the same device. (It might get assigned
/dev/sdd instead of /dev/sdc for example.) If you are interested in
the reasons for this, it should probably be a separate thread...

Mikkel
Oh yes, my processor is slow now. a df command shows this:
[root localhost trade]# df
Filesystem           1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00
                    718841144   8123212 674202912   2% /
/dev/sda1               194442     44177    140226  24% /boot
tmpfs                  1943548        48   1943500   1% /dev/shm
/dev/ram0                15863       728     15135   5% /mnt/rd
/dev/sdf1              3985612     53992   3931620   2% /media/disk

The JetFlash pen is assigned to sdf1. But do I have to assign it to sdc1
for it to work??
What consequences does this have?

Brgds PAR

Nope - but you have to use /dev/sdf instead of /dev/sdc if you want
fdisk to tell you anything about the drive. This is why you were
getting the unable to open /dev/sdc error message from fdisk.

Mikkel
Of course!
And this is what now comes out of the woodwork:
fdisk /dev/sdf1 -l
Disk /dev/sdf1: 4089 MB, 4089428992 bytes
126 heads, 62 sectors/track, 1022 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 7812 * 512 = 3999744 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x69737369

This doesn't look like a partition table
Probably you selected the wrong device.

/dev/sdf1 is a partition.  /dev/sdf is the device.  Try:

    # fdisk -l /dev/sdf

(that's "dash ell", by the way).  That should show you the partition
table on drive /dev/sdf.
Sorry,  my mistake. I don't do these things too often.


[root localhost par]# /sbin/fdisk -l /dev/sdf

Disk /dev/sdf: 4089 MB, 4089445376 bytes
33 heads, 63 sectors/track, 3841 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 2079 * 512 = 1064448 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x7ef87cc2

  Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdf1               1        3842     3993583    b  W95 FAT32

But I cannot see any message here that points out what goes wrong -
why it is set to readonly.

There's nothing wrong with the partition from what I can see.

I'm afraid I've purged the previous messsages in this thread (stupid, I
know), but I do have a few questions.  I'm sure you've answered them
before, but I don't have the data handy.  Bear with me.

1. When you plug the device in, does it automount?

2. If it does automount, run "mount" as root and post the line
regarding that device.  It should start with "/dev/sdf1".

3. The system should mount it somewhere in the /media directory.
If it does, did the system choose the mountpoint name or did you
create a directory that it mounts as?

I can try to help you off-list if you wish.
Of course I'll bear with you, I make more than a fair share of mistakes myself.
My replies:
1) Yes, it automounts.
2) No manual mount is necessary
3) It mounts in the directory /media/disk - I have not done anything to bring this about, it's automatic.

And yet /media/disk is mounted read-only.  This is very odd.

I have unplugged the Jet Flash device, and replugged it again, and this is the system log:
--------------- snip ----------------------
Oct 30 09:21:28 localhost kernel: usb 1-8: USB disconnect, address 6
Oct 30 09:21:28 localhost hald[2162]: forcibly attempting to lazy unmount /dev/sdf1 as enclosing drive was disconnected Oct 30 09:21:29 localhost gnome-keyring-daemon[2721]: removing removable location: volume_uuid_7A22_FF86 Oct 30 09:21:29 localhost hald: unmounted /dev/sdf1 from '/media/disk' on behalf of uid 0

[I guess the logging of the replug starts here]
Oct 30 09:21:35 localhost kernel: usb 1-8: new high speed USB device using ehci_hcd and address 7 Oct 30 09:21:35 localhost kernel: usb 1-8: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice Oct 30 09:21:35 localhost kernel: scsi10 : SCSI emulation for USB Mass Storage devices Oct 30 09:21:35 localhost kernel: usb 1-8: New USB device found, idVendor=058f, idProduct=6387 Oct 30 09:21:35 localhost kernel: usb 1-8: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
Oct 30 09:21:35 localhost kernel: usb 1-8: Product: Mass Storage Device
Oct 30 09:21:35 localhost kernel: usb 1-8: Manufacturer: JetFlash
Oct 30 09:21:35 localhost kernel: usb 1-8: SerialNumber: TCC95547
Oct 30 09:21:41 localhost kernel: scsi 10:0:0:0: Direct-Access JetFlash TS4GJF185 8.07 PQ: 0 ANSI: 2 Oct 30 09:21:41 localhost kernel: sd 10:0:0:0: [sdf] 7987198 512-byte hardware sectors (4089 MB)
Oct 30 09:21:41 localhost kernel: sd 10:0:0:0: [sdf] Write Protect is off
Oct 30 09:21:41 localhost kernel: sd 10:0:0:0: [sdf] Assuming drive cache: write through Oct 30 09:21:41 localhost kernel: sd 10:0:0:0: [sdf] 7987198 512-byte hardware sectors (4089 MB)
Oct 30 09:21:41 localhost kernel: sd 10:0:0:0: [sdf] Write Protect is off
Oct 30 09:21:41 localhost kernel: sd 10:0:0:0: [sdf] Assuming drive cache: write through
Oct 30 09:21:41 localhost kernel: sdf: sdf1
Oct 30 09:21:41 localhost kernel: sd 10:0:0:0: [sdf] Attached SCSI removable disk Oct 30 09:21:41 localhost kernel: sd 10:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg6 type 0
Oct 30 09:21:41 localhost hald: mounted /dev/sdf1 on behalf of uid 500
Oct 30 09:21:41 localhost gnome-keyring-daemon[2721]: adding removable location: volume_uuid_7A22_FF86 at /media/disk Oct 30 09:21:52 localhost gconfd (root-10214): starting (version 2.22.0), pid 10214 user 'root' Oct 30 09:21:52 localhost gconfd (root-10214): Resolved address "xml:readonly:/etc/gconf/gconf.xml.mandatory" to a read-only configuration source at position 0 Oct 30 09:21:52 localhost gconfd (root-10214): Resolved address "xml:readwrite:/root/.gconf" to a writable configuration source at position 1 Oct 30 09:21:52 localhost gconfd (root-10214): Resolved address "xml:readonly:/etc/gconf/gconf.xml.defaults" to a read-only configuration source at position 2
------------------- snip end ----------------------
It says
localhost gconfd (root-10214): Resolved address "xml:readwrite:/root/.gconf" to a writable configuration source at position 1 localhost gconfd (root-10214): Resolved address "xml:readonly:/etc/gconf/gconf.xml.defaults" to a read-only configuration source at position 2

I'm not sure what the position designation means - but position 1 has a writeable config (it says)
whereas position 2 is readonly.
Perhaps "position" means the USB slot? I am not sure.


I would not mind off-list help if you think the problem is of limited public interest.

I don't know if it is, I just tend to offer to address specific issues
off-list.  However, this may have more broad appeal.

I've never really understood all the "xml:readwrite" stuff that Gnome
does, but I've never really taken the time to read up on it.  I don't
get such messages.  Here's a /var/log/messages transcript of what I see
when I plug in a 16GB FLASH drive on a F9 machine:

Oct 30 11:27:35 golem3 kernel: usb 2-1: new high speed USB device using ehci_hcd and address 6 Oct 30 11:27:35 golem3 kernel: usb 2-1: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice Oct 30 11:27:35 golem3 kernel: scsi6 : SCSI emulation for USB Mass Storage devices Oct 30 11:27:35 golem3 kernel: usb 2-1: New USB device found, idVendor=154b, idProduct=000d Oct 30 11:27:35 golem3 kernel: usb 2-1: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
Oct 30 11:27:35 golem3 kernel: usb 2-1: Product: USB 20 DISK
Oct 30 11:27:35 golem3 kernel: usb 2-1: Manufacturer: PNY Technologies
Oct 30 11:27:35 golem3 kernel: usb 2-1: SerialNumber: AA04012700008042
Oct 30 11:27:40 golem3 kernel: scsi 6:0:0:0: Direct-Access PNY USB 2.0 FD 1638 PQ: 0 ANSI: 0 CCS Oct 30 11:27:40 golem3 kernel: sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] 31457280 512-byte hardware sectors (16106 MB)
Oct 30 11:27:40 golem3 kernel: sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Write Protect is off
Oct 30 11:27:40 golem3 kernel: sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Assuming drive cache: write through Oct 30 11:27:40 golem3 kernel: sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] 31457280 512-byte hardware sectors (16106 MB)
Oct 30 11:27:40 golem3 kernel: sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Write Protect is off
Oct 30 11:27:40 golem3 kernel: sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Assuming drive cache: write through
Oct 30 11:27:40 golem3 kernel: sdb: sdb1
Oct 30 11:27:40 golem3 kernel: sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Attached SCSI removable disk
Oct 30 11:27:40 golem3 kernel: sd 6:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg2 type 0
Oct 30 11:27:40 golem3 hald: mounted /dev/sdb1 on behalf of uid 500
Oct 30 11:27:40 golem3 gnome-keyring-daemon[13027]: adding removable location: volume_uuid_D439_4564 at /media/USB 20 DISK

The output of dmesg that corresponds is:

usb 2-1: new high speed USB device using ehci_hcd and address 6
usb 2-1: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice
scsi6 : SCSI emulation for USB Mass Storage devices
usb-storage: device found at 6
usb-storage: waiting for device to settle before scanning
usb 2-1: New USB device found, idVendor=154b, idProduct=000d
usb 2-1: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
usb 2-1: Product: USB 20 DISK
usb 2-1: Manufacturer: PNY Technologies
usb 2-1: SerialNumber: AA04012700008042
usb-storage: device scan complete
scsi 6:0:0:0: Direct-Access PNY USB 2.0 FD 1638 PQ: 0 ANSI: 0 CCS
sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] 31457280 512-byte hardware sectors (16106 MB)
sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Write Protect is off
sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Mode Sense: 43 00 00 00
sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Assuming drive cache: write through
sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] 31457280 512-byte hardware sectors (16106 MB)
sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Write Protect is off
sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Mode Sense: 43 00 00 00
sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Assuming drive cache: write through
 sdb: sdb1
sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Attached SCSI removable disk
sd 6:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg2 type 0
SELinux: initialized (dev sdb1, type vfat), uses genfs_contexts

The output from "mount" referring to the device is:

/dev/sdb1 on /media/USB 20 DISK type vfat (rw,nosuid,nodev,uhelper=hal,shortname=lower,uid=500)

So, this looks to be some weird Gnome muckup on your machine.  I don't
know of a clean way to reset Gnome to a default setting for a given user
shy of:

1. Find some spare space and make a tar archive of the user's home
directory tree.  Make sure you keep permissions and SElinux context.

2. Find out the UID and GID of the user involved

3. Delete the user and the home directory ("userdel -r username")

4. Recreate the user ("useradd -u UID -g GID -m username")

5. Restore the user's files from the tar archive, but make sure you
use the "-k" option so you don't overwrite existing files in the new
home directory (you want the fresh Gnome-related files, not the ones
from the archive).

I SURE hope someone else has a better idea, because this one is a right
pain in the arse!
----------------------------------------------------------------------
- Rick Stevens, Systems Engineer                      ricks nerd com -
- AIM/Skype: therps2        ICQ: 22643734            Yahoo: origrps2 -
-                                                                    -
- Life:  That which happens while you search for the remote control. -
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