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Re: who can introduce me some good redhat linux book and download links



On Sun, 2009-04-19 at 12:01 -0600, Frank Cox wrote:
> On Mon, 20 Apr 2009 00:57:39 +0800
> Nathan Huang wrote:
> 
> > I am new fan in fedora redhat linux, I am intereted in linux and network 
> > administration, who can introduce me some execellent ebook, so that I 
> > can learn linux systematically.
> 
> If you have a specific question this list is an excellent resource for getting
> information of all kinds, but you have to ask a good question to get a good
> answer.
> 
> There are many good sites and tutorials on the net that you can find by typing
> your question or area of interest into Google.
> 
> Since your interest is in network administration, I recommend this site which
> was (and is) an invaluable resource when setting up a network, mail server and
> so on:
> 
> http://www.linuxhomenetworking.com/
> 
> However, if you don't know much about Linux in general, you may want to go
> through some of the many sites that I see when I type "linux for beginners"
> into the Google search box.
> 
> -- 
> MELVILLE THEATRE ~ Melville Sask ~ http://www.melvilletheatre.com
> 
Hi, Frank,
	You are both right and not right.  There are a LOT of bits of
information on the web.  However, not all are well written or well
supportive to the newbie.  Some are even very out of date, which in some
cases means wrong about how things work now.

	When a newbie asks this question they are looking for guidance on the
best available material.  I know that this is a somewhat loaded
question, but there are several places that we all use.  I haven't
checked lately, but I know for example that Fedora had some tutorials
started, and that we have discussed this issue before, as I stated
earlier, though things change.  What was the best is now a bit long in
the tooth.  Maybe we need somewhere to collect the current "best
available" list of documentation and training.  Unfortunately I don't
know how to implement that, but I know that it is an issue.  With paper
books, they had copyright dates, and often the preface told which
software version they addressed, and I would often refer to those bits
to see if the data was accurate and up to date.  But many on line
documents seem to leave that out.  So how does one go about checking
what is the best sources for training and reference material?

Regards,
Les H



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