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Re: removing EISA partition



On Wed, Mar 11, 2009 at 10:23 PM, Hiisi <very-cool rambler ru> wrote:
>> Hi Hiisi,
>> use parted to see the exact layout of your HD
>>
>> HTH
>>
>> 2009/3/11 Hiisi <very-cool rambler ru>
>> > Dear fedora-list members!
>> > On my girlfriend's laptop (Samsung R40) running Fedora 9 is disk
>> shortage
>> > problem. It had 60 Gb hard drive when she brought it a few years ago
>> with
>> > Windows XP already installed. She used it some time before last
>
> summer
>>
>> I
>> > convinced her to switch to Fedora. I formatted disk with standard
>> layout
>> > during installation process. As I can see now it has only 51G
>
> instead
>>
>> of 60:
>> > $ df -H
>> > Filesystem             Size   Used  Avail Use% Mounted on
>> > /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00
>> >                                  51G    31G    18G  65% /
>> > /dev/sda1              200M    27M   163M  14% /boot
>> > tmpfs                      995M    66k   995M   1% /dev/shm
>> > gvfs-fuse-daemon 51G    31G    18G  65% /home/Tarja/.gvfs
>> > I heard somewhere if Windows was installed by manufacturer there's
>> system
>> > config partition called "EISA". I suppose it allocated on those 9G.
>> How can
>> > one kill it and union to the existent filesystem? I googled the
>> problem but
>> > found only howto in Windows.
>> > Thanks in advance.
>> > $ uname -a
>> > Linux imt.ru 2.6.27.19-78.2.30.fc9.i686 #1 SMP Tue Feb 24 20:09:23
>
> EST
>>
>> > 2009 i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux
>> > --
>> > Hiisi.
>> --
>> Alessandro Brezzi
>
> OK. Here's additional information:
> $ fdisk -l
> bash: fdisk: command not found
> (strange thing: many commands are in /sbin folder!)
> $ /sbin/fdisk -l
> (nothing)
> ]# /sbin/parted
> GNU Parted 1.8.8
> Using /dev/sda
> Welcome to GNU Parted! Type 'help' to view a list of commands.
> (parted) print all
> Model: ATA HTS541060G9AT00 (scsi)
> Disk /dev/sda: 52.4GB
> Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
> Partition Table: msdos
>
> Number  Start   End     Size    Type     File system  Flags
> 1      32.3kB  206MB   206MB   primary  ext3         boot
> 2      206MB   52.4GB  52.2GB  primary               lvm
>
> Model: Linux device-mapper (dm)
> Disk /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol01: 940MB
> Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
> Partition Table: loop
>
> Number  Start  End    Size   File system  Flags
> 1      0.00B  940MB  940MB  linux-swap
>
> Model: Linux device-mapper (dm)
> Disk /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00: 51.2GB
> Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
> Partition Table: loop
>
> Number  Start  End     Size    File system  Flags
> 1      0.00B  51.2GB  51.2GB  ext3
>
> What's all that mean? Is it really only 52GB?
> Thanks for Re:!


That used spaced was reserved for root by mkfs when the
partition was created. The mkfs command displays a message to that effect.
When you create a partition mkfs says something like (numbers for example only):
"66970 blocks (5.00%) reserved for the super user"

You can change the reserved block count percentage to 0% for a partition
you already created with:
	# tune2fs -m 0 /dev/sdaX

Or, create the filesystem with:
	# mkfs -t ext2 -m 0 /dev/sdaX

man mkfs.ext2
       -m reserved-blocks-percentage
              Specify the percentage of the filesystem blocks reserved for the
              super-user.   This  avoids  fragmentation, and allows root-owned
              daemons, such as syslogd(8), to continue to  function  correctly
              after non-privileged processes are prevented from writing to the
              filesystem.  The default percentage is 5%.

So, its a good thing to have that reserved space.
The disk is big enough, let it be.

Read the tune2fs and mkfs man pages or eSearch the keywords to learn more.
~af


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