[Date Prev][Date Next]   [Thread Prev][Thread Next]   [Thread Index] [Date Index] [Author Index]

Re: [K12OSN] Re: Responses to the central office



Daniel,

Are you with the people who got Atlanta to pilot the program in six
elementary schools and showed statistically significant performance
gains?

Todd

On Wed, 2006-10-25 at 15:45 -0400, Daniel Howard wrote:
> Hi Todd,
> 
> We had to deal with this kind of resistance and more, and here's how we 
> dealt with the various issues:
> 
> 1.  Keeping it off the district network: Fine, we found many classrooms 
> had two independent Cat5 wires going to the room, so we used one for the 
> district network to the teacher's PC (and any windows PCs required for 
> special purposes) and the other one to feed the K12LTSP servers in each 
> class.  We fed the Internet to the K12LTSP servers via a business class 
> cable modem (6-10 Mbps, $100/month) connected to Squidgard/Dansguardian 
> firewall in IDF.  Ultimately, the PTA paid $9000 to run 40 new Cat6 
> ports from three switches, one to each room and some in hallways (for 
> laptop carts), but finally the district acquiesced and said it would do 
> a pilot of K12LTSP.  The new wiring was timely, as they wanted to do a 
> centralized server model, which requires Gbit/sec to each classroom. But 
> if they hadn't agreed to the pilot, we could have had two independent 
> networks, one for teachers and admin PCs fed by district Internet, and 
> the other fed by cable modem to all the K12LTSP servers and student thin 
> clients.
> 
> 2.  Concern for messing up teacher IP addresses: A district technician 
> came in one day early on in our deployment and rewired a server and it 
> began happily handing out IP addresses to the teacher's PCs, shutting 
> off their Internet access.  That was when the district finally realized 
> that we had moved ahead with our deployment.  Solution: hardcode the MAC 
> addresses of each client to an IP address from each server.  Then, even 
> if miswired, the LTSP server can't give IP addresses to the win PCs.
> 
> 3.  Managing server/configuration: Linux allows secure login to manage 
> each server from anywhere in the network.  With Webmin, it's GUI and 
> easy.  And you can manage more Linux servers more effectively from a 
> single location than with Windows.
> 
> 4. Agree with previous posts on routers as commonplace in home and 
> business networks now.  Point out that his home Cable/DSL router is most 
> likely running Linux.
> 
> 5.  Troubleshooting network problems caused by non-managed computers on
> the network can be incredibly difficult: Reality, from all of this 
> groups' collective experience I'm sure, is that it is *easier* to 
> manage, and the Linux computers *are* managed, but by built-in 
> capabilities instead of purchased software.  Built in Linux management 
> capabilities exceed those of LANDesk currently, e.g., especially given 
> that you can manage all those old Win 95/98 thin clients now, whereas 
> you couldn't before using proprietary tools.  Point out that the 
> experience of others is that managing the K12LTSP servers has proved to 
> be *significantly* less time consuming than Windows platforms.
> 
> Regarding cost benefits, note the following:
> 
> Thin clients running Open Source Software lower the total cost of
> ownership of technology for schools in the following ways:
> 
>    1.  Lower acquistion cost by at least 50%, typically more.  Software 
> cost is zero.
>    2.  Lower operational cost via reduced electricity requirements:  1/5 
> Wattage of normal PC, plus smaller form factor: you can fit twice the 
> number of thin clients on the same table.  Space and electricity were 
> the final challenges we had at Brandon as we moved to a 2:1 classroom model.
>    4.  Lower support cost: you only manage the servers, and one server
> can run up to 100 thin clients.  Linux admin can manage more PCs than 
> equivalent Windows admin.
>    5.  Lower cost of retirement: thin clients weigh less than 1/5 of
> normal PCs and schools have to pay by the pound to have them hauled off.
> 
> Plus, you can put dozens of modern educational software applications in 
> front of your students for free, and can burn CDs with the software for 
> the kids to take home and use there.  Open Source Software is free to 
> use and distribute as one desires.  Figure out the cost of providing 
> copies of MS office for every home with a PC, let alone Adobe Photoshop, 
> a 3-D rendering package like the GIMP (doesn't exist, and by the way 
> most Hollywood animation outfits have switched to Linux/GIMP), etc...
> 
> Regards,
> Daniel
> 
> -- 
> Daniel Howard
> President and CEO
> Georgia Open Source Education Foundation
> 


[Date Prev][Date Next]   [Thread Prev][Thread Next]   [Thread Index] [Date Index] [Author Index]