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Re: [libvirt] [PATCH] Generate HACKING from docs/hacking.html.in



2010/11/11 Eric Blake <eblake redhat com>:
> On 11/11/2010 01:39 PM, Matthias Bolte wrote:
>> Tweak pre tags in docs/hacking.html.in to achieve proper
>> indentation of their plaintext representation.
>>
>> Also use more b/i/code tags in docs/hacking.html.in.
>> ---
>>  HACKING              |  602 +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------
>
> A lot of this diff is whitespace; the rest looks like it is pulling in
> missed bits.  Overall, it looks pretty decent; and it's certainly more
> maintainable!
>
>>  Makefile.am          |    8 +
>>  docs/hacking.html.in |  351 ++++++++++++++++--------------
>
> Would you mind splitting this into two patches?  One that cleans up just
> hacking.html.in, and the rest that covers going from a clean source file
> into the new generated HACKING file.

I did that now.

>> +++ b/Makefile.am
>> @@ -48,6 +48,8 @@ EXTRA_DIST = \
>>  pkgconfigdir = $(libdir)/pkgconfig
>>  pkgconfig_DATA = libvirt.pc
>>
>> +all: NEWS HACKING
>
> Hmm.  This means that everyone will attempt to build NEWS and HACKING,
> even if they don't have the prerequisite tools.

I changed that to:

syntax-check: $(top_srcdir)/HACKING

>>         $(XSLTPROC) --nonet $(top_srcdir)/docs/news.xsl       \
>> @@ -56,6 +58,12 @@ NEWS: $(top_srcdir)/docs/news.xsl $(top_srcdir)/docs/news.html.in
>>          | perl -pe 's/[ \t]+$$//'                            \
>>          > $ -t && mv $ -t $@ ; fi );
>>
>> +HACKING: $(top_srcdir)/docs/hacking1.xsl $(top_srcdir)/docs/hacking2.xsl \

> If HACKING stays in git, then it must also reside in $(srcdir) rather
> than $(builddir), which means this rule needs a bit of tweaking to be
> VPATH-friendly.

I think it should stay in git and changed the rule to

$(top_srcdir)/HACKING: ...

I also tested it in a VPATH build and it works as it should.

v2 is attached.

Matthias
From dcd3513dd5d31cf074bc19e1ade9e2485cf4bd5e Mon Sep 17 00:00:00 2001
From: Matthias Bolte <matthias bolte googlemail com>
Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2010 15:33:00 +0100
Subject: [PATCH] docs: Prepare hacking.html.in to generate HACKING from it

Tweak pre tags to achieve proper indentation of their
plaintext representation. Also use more b/i/code tags.
---
 docs/hacking.html.in |  351 +++++++++++++++++++++++++++-----------------------
 1 files changed, 189 insertions(+), 162 deletions(-)

diff --git a/docs/hacking.html.in b/docs/hacking.html.in
index bd8b443..88db01a 100644
--- a/docs/hacking.html.in
+++ b/docs/hacking.html.in
@@ -5,20 +5,21 @@
     <ul id="toc"></ul>
 
     <h2><a name="patches">General tips for contributing patches</a></h2>
-
     <ol>
       <li>Discuss any large changes on the mailing list first.  Post patches
         early and listen to feedback.</li>
 
       <li><p>Post patches in unified diff format.  A command similar to this
         should work:</p>
-        <pre>
-  diff -urp libvirt.orig/ libvirt.modified/ &gt; libvirt-myfeature.patch</pre>
+<pre>
+  diff -urp libvirt.orig/ libvirt.modified/ &gt; libvirt-myfeature.patch
+</pre>
         <p>
           or:
         </p>
-        <pre>
-  git diff > libvirt-myfeature.patch</pre>
+<pre>
+  git diff > libvirt-myfeature.patch
+</pre>
       </li>
       <li>Split large changes into a series of smaller patches, self-contained
         if possible, with an explanation of each patch and an explanation of how
@@ -27,35 +28,39 @@
         only follow GIT and don't care much about released versions.</li>
       <li><p>Run the automated tests on your code before submitting any changes.
           In particular, configure with compile warnings set to -Werror:</p>
-        <pre>
-  ./configure --enable-compile-warnings=error</pre>
+<pre>
+  ./configure --enable-compile-warnings=error
+</pre>
         <p>
           and run the tests:
         </p>
-        <pre>
+<pre>
   make check
   make syntax-check
-  make -C tests valgrind</pre>
+  make -C tests valgrind
+</pre>
         <p>
           The latter test checks for memory leaks.
         </p>
 
-	<p>
-	  If you encounter any failing tests, the VIR_TEST_DEBUG
-	  environment variable may provide extra information to debug
-	  the failures. Larger values of VIR_TEST_DEBUG may provide
-	  larger amounts of information:
-	</p>
+        <p>
+          If you encounter any failing tests, the VIR_TEST_DEBUG
+          environment variable may provide extra information to debug
+          the failures. Larger values of VIR_TEST_DEBUG may provide
+          larger amounts of information:
+        </p>
 
-	<pre>
+<pre>
   VIR_TEST_DEBUG=1 make check    (or)
-  VIR_TEST_DEBUG=2 make check</pre>
-	<p>
-	  Also, individual tests can be run from inside the 'tests/'
-	  directory, like:
-	</p>
-	<pre>
-  ./qemuxml2xmltest</pre>
+  VIR_TEST_DEBUG=2 make check
+</pre>
+        <p>
+          Also, individual tests can be run from inside the <code>tests/</code>
+          directory, like:
+        </p>
+<pre>
+  ./qemuxml2xmltest
+</pre>
 
       </li>
       <li>Update tests and/or documentation, particularly if you are adding
@@ -82,7 +87,7 @@
       If you use Emacs, add the following to one of one of your start-up files
       (e.g., ~/.emacs), to help ensure that you get indentation right:
     </p>
-    <pre>
+<pre>
   ;;; When editing C sources in libvirt, use this style.
   (defun libvirt-c-mode ()
     "C mode with adjusted defaults for use with libvirt."
@@ -105,7 +110,7 @@
       around operators and keywords:
     </p>
 
-    <pre>
+<pre>
   indent-libvirt()
   {
     indent -bad -bap -bbb -bli4 -br -ce -brs -cs -i4 -l75 -lc75 \
@@ -116,7 +121,7 @@
 
     <p>
       Note that sometimes you'll have to post-process that output further, by
-      piping it through "expand -i", since some leading TABs can get through.
+      piping it through <code>expand -i</code>, since some leading TABs can get through.
       Usually they're in macro definitions or strings, and should be converted
       anyhow.
     </p>
@@ -125,18 +130,20 @@
     <h2><a name="curly_braces">Curly braces</a></h2>
 
     <p>
-      Omit the curly braces around an "if", "while", "for" etc. body only
+      Omit the curly braces around an <code>if</code>, <code>while</code>,
+      <code>for</code> etc. body only
       when that body occupies a single line.  In every other case we require
       the braces.  This ensures that it is trivially easy to identify a
-      single-*statement* loop: each has only one *line* in its body.
+      single-<i>statement</i> loop: each has only one <i>line</i> in its body.
     </p>
     <p>
       Omitting braces with a single-line body is fine:
     </p>
 
-    <pre>
+<pre>
   while (expr) // one-line body -> omitting curly braces is ok
-      single_line_stmt ();</pre>
+      single_line_stmt();
+</pre>
 
     <p>
       However, the moment your loop/if/else body extends onto a second
@@ -146,26 +153,29 @@
       it is already a multi-statement loop:
     </p>
 
-    <pre>
+<pre>
   while (true) // BAD! multi-line body with no braces
       /* comment... */
-      single_line_stmt ();</pre>
+      single_line_stmt();
+</pre>
     <p>
       Do this instead:
     </p>
-    <pre>
+<pre>
   while (true) { // Always put braces around a multi-line body.
       /* comment... */
-      single_line_stmt ();
-  }</pre>
+      single_line_stmt();
+  }
+</pre>
     <p>
       There is one exception: when the second body line is not at the same
       indentation level as the first body line:
     </p>
-    <pre>
+<pre>
   if (expr)
-      die ("a diagnostic that would make this line"
-           " extend past the 80-column limit"));</pre>
+      die("a diagnostic that would make this line"
+          " extend past the 80-column limit"));
+</pre>
 
     <p>
       It is safe to omit the braces in the code above, since the
@@ -177,40 +187,44 @@
       To reiterate, don't do this:
     </p>
 
-    <pre>
+<pre>
   if (expr)            // BAD: no braces around...
       while (expr_2) { // ... a multi-line body
           ...
-      }</pre>
+      }
+</pre>
 
     <p>
       Do this, instead:
     </p>
 
-    <pre>
+<pre>
   if (expr) {
       while (expr_2) {
           ...
       }
-  }</pre>
+  }
+</pre>
 
     <p>
       However, there is one exception in the other direction, when even a
       one-line block should have braces.  That occurs when that one-line,
-      brace-less block is an "else" block, and the corresponding "then" block
-      *does* use braces.  In that case, either put braces around the "else"
-      block, or negate the "if"-condition and swap the bodies, putting the
+      brace-less block is an <code>else</code> block, and the corresponding
+      <code>then</code> block <b>does</b> use braces.  In that case, either
+      put braces around the <code>else</code> block, or negate the
+      <code>if</code>-condition and swap the bodies, putting the
       one-line block first and making the longer, multi-line block be the
-      "else" block.
+      <code>else</code> block.
     </p>
 
-    <pre>
+<pre>
   if (expr) {
       ...
       ...
   }
   else
-      x = y;    // BAD: braceless "else" with braced "then"</pre>
+      x = y;    // BAD: braceless "else" with braced "then"
+</pre>
 
     <p>
       This is preferred, especially when the multi-line body is more than a
@@ -219,43 +233,45 @@
       after the more involved block:
     </p>
 
-    <pre>
+<pre>
   if (!expr)
     x = y; // putting the smaller block first is more readable
   else {
       ...
       ...
-  }</pre>
+  }
+</pre>
 
     <p>
       If you'd rather not negate the condition, then at least add braces:
     </p>
 
-    <pre>
+<pre>
   if (expr) {
       ...
       ...
   } else {
       x = y;
-  }</pre>
+  }
+</pre>
 
     <h2><a href="types">Preprocessor</a></h2>
 
     <p>
       For variadic macros, stick with C99 syntax:
     </p>
-  <pre>
+<pre>
   #define vshPrint(_ctl, ...) fprintf(stdout, __VA_ARGS__)
-  </pre>
+</pre>
 
     <p>Use parenthesis when checking if a macro is defined, and use
     indentation to track nesting:
     </p>
-  <pre>
+<pre>
   #if defined(HAVE_POSIX_FALLOCATE) &amp;&amp; !defined(HAVE_FALLOCATE)
   # define fallocate(a,ignored,b,c) posix_fallocate(a,b,c)
   #endif
-  </pre>
+</pre>
 
     <h2><a href="types">C types</a></h2>
 
@@ -266,45 +282,51 @@
     <h3>Scalars</h3>
 
     <ul>
-      <li>If you're using "int" or "long", odds are good that there's a better type.</li>
+      <li>If you're using <code>int</code> or <code>long</code>, odds are
+          good that there's a better type.</li>
       <li>If a variable is counting something, be sure to declare it with an
         unsigned type.</li>
-      <li>If it's memory-size-related, use size_t (use ssize_t only if required).</li>
-      <li>If it's file-size related, use uintmax_t, or maybe off_t.</li>
-      <li>If it's file-offset related (i.e., signed), use off_t.</li>
-      <li>If it's just counting small numbers use "unsigned int";
+      <li>If it's memory-size-related, use <code>size_t</code> (use
+        <code>ssize_t</code> only if required).</li>
+      <li>If it's file-size related, use uintmax_t, or maybe <code>off_t</code>.</li>
+      <li>If it's file-offset related (i.e., signed), use <code>off_t</code>.</li>
+      <li>If it's just counting small numbers use <code>unsigned int</code>;
         (on all but oddball embedded systems, you can assume that that
         type is at least four bytes wide).</li>
-      <li>If a variable has boolean semantics, give it the "bool" type
-        and use the corresponding "true" and "false" macros.  It's ok
-        to include &lt;stdbool.h&gt;, since libvirt's use of gnulib ensures
+      <li>If a variable has boolean semantics, give it the <code>bool</code> type
+        and use the corresponding <code>true</code> and <code>false</code> macros.
+         It's ok to include &lt;stdbool.h&gt;, since libvirt's use of gnulib ensures
           that it exists and is usable.</li>
       <li>In the unusual event that you require a specific width, use a
-        standard type like int32_t, uint32_t, uint64_t, etc.</li>
-      <li>While using "bool" is good for readability, it comes with minor caveats:
+        standard type like <code>int32_t</code>, <code>uint32_t</code>,
+        <code>uint64_t</code>, etc.</li>
+      <li>While using <code>bool</code> is good for readability, it comes with
+          minor caveats:
         <ul>
-          <li>Don't use "bool" in places where the type size must be constant across
+          <li>Don't use <code>bool</code> in places where the type size must be constant across
             all systems, like public interfaces and on-the-wire protocols.  Note
-            that it would be possible (albeit wasteful) to use "bool" in libvirt's
-            logical wire protocol, since XDR maps that to its lower-level bool_t
-            type, which *is* fixed-size.</li>
-          <li>Don't compare a bool variable against the literal, "true",
-            since a value with a logical non-false value need not be "1".
-            I.e., don't write "if (seen == true) ...".  Rather, write "if (seen)...".</li>
+            that it would be possible (albeit wasteful) to use <code>bool</code> in libvirt's
+            logical wire protocol, since XDR maps that to its lower-level <code>bool_t</code>
+            type, which <b>is</b> fixed-size.</li>
+          <li>Don't compare a bool variable against the literal, <code>true</code>,
+            since a value with a logical non-false value need not be <code>1</code>.
+            I.e., don't write <code>if (seen == true) ...</code>.  Rather,
+            write <code>if (seen)...</code>.</li>
         </ul>
       </li>
     </ul>
 
     <p>
       Of course, take all of the above with a grain of salt.  If you're about
-      to use some system interface that requires a type like size_t, pid_t or
-      off_t, use matching types for any corresponding variables.
+      to use some system interface that requires a type like <code>size_t</code>,
+      <code>pid_t</code> or <code>off_t</code>, use matching types for any
+      corresponding variables.
     </p>
 
     <p>
-      Also, if you try to use e.g., "unsigned int" as a type, and that
+      Also, if you try to use e.g., <code>unsigned int</code> as a type, and that
       conflicts with the signedness of a related variable, sometimes
-      it's best just to use the *wrong* type, if "pulling the thread"
+      it's best just to use the <b>wrong</b> type, if <i>pulling the thread</i>
       and fixing all related variables would be too invasive.
     </p>
 
@@ -317,9 +339,9 @@
     <h3>Pointers</h3>
 
     <p>
-      Ensure that all of your pointers are "const-correct".
+      Ensure that all of your pointers are <i>const-correct</i>.
       Unless a pointer is used to modify the pointed-to storage,
-      give it the "const" attribute.  That way, the reader knows
+      give it the <code>const</code> attribute.  That way, the reader knows
       up-front that this is a read-only pointer.  Perhaps more
       importantly, if we're diligent about this, when you see a non-const
       pointer, you're guaranteed that it is used to modify the storage
@@ -336,57 +358,57 @@
     </p>
 
     <ul>
-      <li><p>eg to allocate  a single object:</p>
-
+      <li><p>e.g. to allocate  a single object:</p>
 <pre>
-      virDomainPtr domain;
+  virDomainPtr domain;
 
-      if (VIR_ALLOC(domain) &lt; 0) {
-          virReportOOMError();
-          return NULL;
-      }
-</pre></li>
-
-      <li><p>eg to allocate an array of objects</p>
+  if (VIR_ALLOC(domain) &lt; 0) {
+      virReportOOMError();
+      return NULL;
+  }
+</pre>
+      </li>
 
+      <li><p>e.g. to allocate an array of objects</p>
 <pre>
-       virDomainPtr domains;
-       int ndomains = 10;
-
-       if (VIR_ALLOC_N(domains, ndomains) &lt; 0) {
-           virReportOOMError();
-           return NULL;
-       }
-</pre></li>
+  virDomainPtr domains;
+  int ndomains = 10;
 
-      <li><p>eg to allocate an array of object pointers</p>
+  if (VIR_ALLOC_N(domains, ndomains) &lt; 0) {
+      virReportOOMError();
+      return NULL;
+  }
+</pre>
+      </li>
 
+      <li><p>e.g. to allocate an array of object pointers</p>
 <pre>
-       virDomainPtr *domains;
-       int ndomains = 10;
+  virDomainPtr *domains;
+  int ndomains = 10;
 
-       if (VIR_ALLOC_N(domains, ndomains) &lt; 0) {
-           virReportOOMError();
-           return NULL;
-       }
-</pre></li>
-
-      <li><p>eg to re-allocate the array of domains to be longer</p>
+  if (VIR_ALLOC_N(domains, ndomains) &lt; 0) {
+      virReportOOMError();
+      return NULL;
+  }
+</pre>
+      </li>
 
+      <li><p>e.g. to re-allocate the array of domains to be longer</p>
 <pre>
-       ndomains = 20
-
-       if (VIR_REALLOC_N(domains, ndomains) &lt; 0) {
-           virReportOOMError();
-           return NULL;
-       }
-</pre></li>
+  ndomains = 20
 
-      <li><p>eg to free the domain</p>
+  if (VIR_REALLOC_N(domains, ndomains) &lt; 0) {
+      virReportOOMError();
+      return NULL;
+  }
+</pre>
+      </li>
 
+      <li><p>e.g. to free the domain</p>
 <pre>
-       VIR_FREE(domain);
-</pre></li>
+  VIR_FREE(domain);
+</pre>
+       </li>
     </ul>
 
     <h2><a name="file_handling">File handling</a></h2>
@@ -398,20 +420,21 @@
     </p>
 
     <ul>
-      <li><p>eg close a file descriptor</p>
-
+      <li><p>e.g. close a file descriptor</p>
 <pre>
-       if (VIR_CLOSE(fd) &lt; 0) {
-           virReportSystemError(errno, _("failed to close file"));
-       }
-</pre></li>
+  if (VIR_CLOSE(fd) &lt; 0) {
+      virReportSystemError(errno, _("failed to close file"));
+  }
+</pre>
+       </li>
 
       <li><p>eg close a file descriptor in an error path, without losing
              the previous errno value</p>
 
 <pre>
-       VIR_FORCE_CLOSE(fd);
-</pre></li>
+  VIR_FORCE_CLOSE(fd);
+</pre>
+      </li>
     </ul>
 
     <h2><a name="string_comparision">String comparisons</a></h2>
@@ -423,39 +446,36 @@
 
     <ul>
       <li><p>For strict equality:</p>
-        <pre>
-     STREQ(a,b)
-     STRNEQ(a,b)
+<pre>
+  STREQ(a,b)
+  STRNEQ(a,b)
 </pre>
       </li>
 
       <li><p>For case insensitive equality:</p>
-        <pre>
-     STRCASEEQ(a,b)
-     STRCASENEQ(a,b)
+<pre>
+  STRCASEEQ(a,b)
+  STRCASENEQ(a,b)
 </pre>
       </li>
 
       <li><p>For strict equality of a substring:</p>
-
-        <pre>
-     STREQLEN(a,b,n)
-     STRNEQLEN(a,b,n)
+<pre>
+  STREQLEN(a,b,n)
+  STRNEQLEN(a,b,n)
 </pre>
       </li>
 
       <li><p>For case insensitive equality of a substring:</p>
-
-        <pre>
-     STRCASEEQLEN(a,b,n)
-     STRCASENEQLEN(a,b,n)
+<pre>
+  STRCASEEQLEN(a,b,n)
+  STRCASENEQLEN(a,b,n)
 </pre>
       </li>
 
       <li><p>For strict equality of a prefix:</p>
-
-        <pre>
-     STRPREFIX(a,b)
+<pre>
+  STRPREFIX(a,b)
 </pre>
       </li>
     </ul>
@@ -469,7 +489,10 @@
       it extremely dangerous to use.  Instead, use one of the
       functionally equivalent functions:
     </p>
-    <pre>virStrncpy(char *dest, const char *src, size_t n, size_t destbytes)</pre>
+
+<pre>
+  virStrncpy(char *dest, const char *src, size_t n, size_t destbytes)
+</pre>
     <p>
       The first three arguments have the same meaning as for strncpy;
       namely the destination, source, and number of bytes to copy,
@@ -481,8 +504,9 @@
       trailing \0 is appended.
     </p>
 
-    <pre>virStrcpy(char *dest, const char *src, size_t destbytes)</pre>
-
+<pre>
+  virStrcpy(char *dest, const char *src, size_t destbytes)
+</pre>
     <p>
       Use this variant if you know you want to copy the entire src
       string into dest.  Note that this is a macro, so arguments could
@@ -490,11 +514,12 @@
       virStrncpy(dest, src, strlen(src), destbytes)
       </p>
 
-    <pre>virStrcpyStatic(char *dest, const char *src)</pre>
-
+<pre>
+  virStrcpyStatic(char *dest, const char *src)
+</pre>
     <p>
       Use this variant if you know you want to copy the entire src
-      string into dest *and* you know that your destination string is
+      string into dest <b>and</b> you know that your destination string is
       a static string (i.e. that sizeof(dest) returns something
       meaningful).  Note that this is a macro, so arguments could be
       evaluated more than once.  This is equivalent to
@@ -511,9 +536,10 @@
 
     <p>eg typical usage is as follows:</p>
 
-    <pre>
+<pre>
   char *
-  somefunction(...) {
+  somefunction(...)
+  {
      virBuffer buf = VIR_BUFFER_INITIALIZER;
 
      ...
@@ -545,7 +571,7 @@
       *.c source files:
     </p>
 
-    <pre>
+<pre>
   /*
    * Copyright notice
    * ....
@@ -561,7 +587,7 @@
   #include &lt;limits.h&gt;
 
   #if HAVE_NUMACTL                Some system includes aren't supported
-  # include &lt;numa.h&gt;               everywhere so need these #if guards.
+  # include &lt;numa.h&gt;              everywhere so need these #if guards.
   #endif
 
   #include "internal.h"           Include this first, after system includes.
@@ -569,13 +595,13 @@
   #include "util.h"               Any libvirt internal header files.
   #include "buf.h"
 
-  static myInternalFunc ()        The actual code.
+  static myInternalFunc()         The actual code.
   {
-    ...
+      ...
 </pre>
 
     <p>
-      Of particular note: *DO NOT* include libvirt/libvirt.h or
+      Of particular note: <b>Do not</b> include libvirt/libvirt.h or
       libvirt/virterror.h.  It is included by "internal.h" already and there
       are some special reasons why you cannot include these files
       explicitly.
@@ -591,9 +617,9 @@
       the one for virAsprintf, in util.h:
     </p>
 
-    <pre>
-    int virAsprintf(char **strp, const char *fmt, ...)
-        ATTRIBUTE_FORMAT(printf, 2, 3);
+<pre>
+  int virAsprintf(char **strp, const char *fmt, ...)
+      ATTRIBUTE_FORMAT(printf, 2, 3);
 </pre>
 
     <p>
@@ -654,7 +680,7 @@
       Although libvirt does not encourage the Linux kernel wind/unwind
       style of multiple labels, there's a good general discussion of
       the issue archived at
-      <a href=http://kerneltrap.org/node/553/2131>KernelTrap</a>
+      <a href="http://kerneltrap.org/node/553/2131";>KernelTrap</a>
     </p>
 
     <p>
@@ -662,11 +688,12 @@
       makes sense:
     </p>
 
-    <pre>
+<pre>
       error: A path only taken upon return with an error code
     cleanup: A path taken upon return with success code + optional error
   no_memory: A path only taken upon return with an OOM error code
-      retry: If needing to jump upwards (eg retry on EINTR)</pre>
+      retry: If needing to jump upwards (eg retry on EINTR)
+</pre>
 
 
 
@@ -691,7 +718,7 @@
       configure with
     </p>
 <pre>
-      --enable-compile-warnings=error
+  --enable-compile-warnings=error
 </pre>
     <p>
       which adds -Werror to compile flags, so no warnings get missed
-- 
1.7.0.4

From 92dd2632553c011b2511772346b138c2eab627d8 Mon Sep 17 00:00:00 2001
From: Matthias Bolte <matthias bolte googlemail com>
Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2010 15:36:53 +0100
Subject: [PATCH] Generate HACKING from docs/hacking.html.in

---
 HACKING             |  599 +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++----------------------
 Makefile.am         |    9 +
 docs/hacking1.xsl   |   28 +++
 docs/hacking2.xsl   |  146 +++++++++++++
 docs/wrapstring.xsl |   56 +++++
 5 files changed, 581 insertions(+), 257 deletions(-)
 create mode 100644 docs/hacking1.xsl
 create mode 100644 docs/hacking2.xsl
 create mode 100644 docs/wrapstring.xsl

diff --git a/HACKING b/HACKING
index a9a9b49..cf0f382 100644
--- a/HACKING
+++ b/HACKING
@@ -1,18 +1,19 @@
 -*- buffer-read-only: t -*- vi: set ro:
 DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE!  IT IS GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY!
 
-                    Libvirt contributor guidelines
-                    ==============================
+
+
+                         Contributor guidelines
+                         ======================
+
 
 
 General tips for contributing patches
 =====================================
+(1) Discuss any large changes on the mailing list first. Post patches early and
+listen to feedback.
 
-(1) Discuss any large changes on the mailing list first.  Post patches
-early and listen to feedback.
-
-(2) Post patches in unified diff format.  A command similar to this
-should work:
+(2) Post patches in unified diff format. A command similar to this should work:
 
   diff -urp libvirt.orig/ libvirt.modified/ > libvirt-myfeature.patch
 
@@ -20,15 +21,15 @@ or:
 
   git diff > libvirt-myfeature.patch
 
-(3) Split large changes into a series of smaller patches, self-contained
-if possible, with an explanation of each patch and an explanation of how
-the sequence of patches fits together.
+(3) Split large changes into a series of smaller patches, self-contained if
+possible, with an explanation of each patch and an explanation of how the
+sequence of patches fits together.
 
-(4) Make sure your patches apply against libvirt GIT.  Developers
-only follow GIT and don't care much about released versions.
+(4) Make sure your patches apply against libvirt GIT. Developers only follow GIT
+and don't care much about released versions.
 
-(5) Run the automated tests on your code before submitting any changes.
-In particular, configure with compile warnings set to -Werror:
+(5) Run the automated tests on your code before submitting any changes. In
+particular, configure with compile warnings set to -Werror:
 
   ./configure --enable-compile-warnings=error
 
@@ -47,28 +48,29 @@ VIR_TEST_DEBUG may provide larger amounts of information:
   VIR_TEST_DEBUG=1 make check    (or)
   VIR_TEST_DEBUG=2 make check
 
-Also, individual tests can be run from inside the 'tests/' directory, like:
+Also, individual tests can be run from inside the "tests/" directory, like:
 
   ./qemuxml2xmltest
 
-(6) Update tests and/or documentation, particularly if you are adding
-a new feature or changing the output of a program.
+(6) Update tests and/or documentation, particularly if you are adding a new
+feature or changing the output of a program.
 
 
-There is more on this subject, including lots of links to background
-reading on the subject, on this page:
 
-  http://et.redhat.com/~rjones/how-to-supply-code-to-open-source-projects/
+There is more on this subject, including lots of links to background reading
+on the subject, on
 
+  Richard Jones' guide to working with open source projects
+  http://et.redhat.com/~rjones/how-to-supply-code-to-open-source-projects/
 
 
 Code indentation
 ================
 Libvirt's C source code generally adheres to some basic code-formatting
-conventions.  The existing code base is not totally consistent on this
-front, but we do prefer that contributed code be formatted similarly.
-In short, use spaces-not-TABs for indentation, use 4 spaces for each
-indentation level, and other than that, follow the K&R style.
+conventions. The existing code base is not totally consistent on this front,
+but we do prefer that contributed code be formatted similarly. In short, use
+spaces-not-TABs for indentation, use 4 spaces for each indentation level, and
+other than that, follow the K&R style.
 
 If you use Emacs, add the following to one of one of your start-up files
 (e.g., ~/.emacs), to help ensure that you get indentation right:
@@ -82,15 +84,15 @@ If you use Emacs, add the following to one of one of your start-up files
     (setq c-indent-level 4)
     (setq c-basic-offset 4))
   (add-hook 'c-mode-hook
-	    '(lambda () (if (string-match "/libvirt" (buffer-file-name))
-			    (libvirt-c-mode))))
+            '(lambda () (if (string-match "/libvirt" (buffer-file-name))
+                            (libvirt-c-mode))))
+
 
 Code formatting (especially for new code)
 =========================================
-With new code, we can be even more strict.
-Please apply the following function (using GNU indent) to any new code.
-Note that this also gives you an idea of the type of spacing we prefer
-around operators and keywords:
+With new code, we can be even more strict. Please apply the following function
+(using GNU indent) to any new code. Note that this also gives you an idea of
+the type of spacing we prefer around operators and keywords:
 
   indent-libvirt()
   {
@@ -99,66 +101,63 @@ around operators and keywords:
       --no-tabs "$@"
   }
 
-Note that sometimes you'll have to post-process that output further, by
-piping it through "expand -i", since some leading TABs can get through.
-Usually they're in macro definitions or strings, and should be converted
-anyhow.
+Note that sometimes you'll have to post-process that output further, by piping
+it through "expand -i", since some leading TABs can get through. Usually
+they're in macro definitions or strings, and should be converted anyhow.
 
 
 Curly braces
 ============
 Omit the curly braces around an "if", "while", "for" etc. body only when that
 body occupies a single line. In every other case we require the braces. This
-ensures that it is trivially easy to identify a single-*statement* loop: each
-has only one *line* in its body.
+ensures that it is trivially easy to identify a single-'statement' loop: each
+has only one 'line' in its body.
 
 Omitting braces with a single-line body is fine:
 
-   while (expr) // one-line body -> omitting curly braces is ok
-       single_line_stmt ();
+  while (expr) // one-line body -> omitting curly braces is ok
+      single_line_stmt();
 
 However, the moment your loop/if/else body extends onto a second line, for
 whatever reason (even if it's just an added comment), then you should add
 braces. Otherwise, it would be too easy to insert a statement just before that
-comment (without adding braces), thinking it is already a multi-statement
-loop:
+comment (without adding braces), thinking it is already a multi-statement loop:
 
-   while (true) // BAD! multi-line body with no braces
-       /* comment... */
-       single_line_stmt ();
+  while (true) // BAD! multi-line body with no braces
+      /* comment... */
+      single_line_stmt();
 
 Do this instead:
 
-   while (true) { // Always put braces around a multi-line body.
-       /* comment... */
-       single_line_stmt ();
-   }
+  while (true) { // Always put braces around a multi-line body.
+      /* comment... */
+      single_line_stmt();
+  }
 
 There is one exception: when the second body line is not at the same
 indentation level as the first body line:
 
-   if (expr)
-       die ("a diagnostic that would make this line"
-            " extend past the 80-column limit"));
+  if (expr)
+      die("a diagnostic that would make this line"
+          " extend past the 80-column limit"));
 
 It is safe to omit the braces in the code above, since the further-indented
 second body line makes it obvious that this is still a single-statement body.
 
-
 To reiterate, don't do this:
 
-   if (expr)            // BAD: no braces around...
-       while (expr_2) { // ... a multi-line body
-           ...
-       }
+  if (expr)            // BAD: no braces around...
+      while (expr_2) { // ... a multi-line body
+          ...
+      }
 
 Do this, instead:
 
-   if (expr) {
-       while (expr_2) {
-           ...
-       }
-   }
+  if (expr) {
+      while (expr_2) {
+          ...
+      }
+  }
 
 However, there is one exception in the other direction, when even a one-line
 block should have braces. That occurs when that one-line, brace-less block is
@@ -167,47 +166,47 @@ case, either put braces around the "else" block, or negate the "if"-condition
 and swap the bodies, putting the one-line block first and making the longer,
 multi-line block be the "else" block.
 
-   if (expr) {
-       ...
-       ...
-   }
-   else
-       x = y;    // BAD: braceless "else" with braced "then"
+  if (expr) {
+      ...
+      ...
+  }
+  else
+      x = y;    // BAD: braceless "else" with braced "then"
 
 This is preferred, especially when the multi-line body is more than a few
-lines long, because it is easier to read and grasp the semantics of an if-
-then-else block when the simpler block occurs first, rather than after the
+lines long, because it is easier to read and grasp the semantics of an
+if-then-else block when the simpler block occurs first, rather than after the
 more involved block:
 
-   if (!expr)
-     x = y; // putting the smaller block first is more readable
-   else {
-       ...
-       ...
-   }
+  if (!expr)
+    x = y; // putting the smaller block first is more readable
+  else {
+      ...
+      ...
+  }
 
 If you'd rather not negate the condition, then at least add braces:
 
-   if (expr) {
-       ...
-       ...
-   } else {
-       x = y;
-   }
+  if (expr) {
+      ...
+      ...
+  } else {
+      x = y;
+  }
 
 
 Preprocessor
 ============
 For variadic macros, stick with C99 syntax:
 
-#define vshPrint(_ctl, ...)   fprintf(stdout, __VA_ARGS__)
+  #define vshPrint(_ctl, ...) fprintf(stdout, __VA_ARGS__)
 
-Use parenthesis when checking if a macro is defined, and use
-indentation to track nesting:
+Use parenthesis when checking if a macro is defined, and use indentation to
+track nesting:
 
-#if defined(HAVE_POSIX_FALLOCATE) && !defined(HAVE_FALLOCATE)
-# define fallocate(a,ignored,b,c) posix_fallocate(a,b,c)
-#endif
+  #if defined(HAVE_POSIX_FALLOCATE) && !defined(HAVE_FALLOCATE)
+  # define fallocate(a,ignored,b,c) posix_fallocate(a,b,c)
+  #endif
 
 
 C types
@@ -216,199 +215,235 @@ Use the right type.
 
 Scalars
 -------
-If you're using "int" or "long", odds are good that there's a better type.
-If a variable is counting something, be sure to declare it with an
-unsigned type.
-If it's memory-size-related, use size_t (use ssize_t only if required).
-If it's file-size related, use uintmax_t, or maybe off_t.
-If it's file-offset related (i.e., signed), use off_t.
-If it's just counting small numbers use "unsigned int";
-(on all but oddball embedded systems, you can assume that that
-type is at least four bytes wide).
-If a variable has boolean semantics, give it the "bool" type
-and use the corresponding "true" and "false" macros.  It's ok
-to include <stdbool.h>, since libvirt's use of gnulib ensures
-that it exists and is usable.
-In the unusual event that you require a specific width, use a
-standard type like int32_t, uint32_t, uint64_t, etc.
-
-While using "bool" is good for readability, it comes with minor caveats:
- - Don't use "bool" in places where the type size must be constant across
-   all systems, like public interfaces and on-the-wire protocols.  Note
-   that it would be possible (albeit wasteful) to use "bool" in libvirt's
-   logical wire protocol, since XDR maps that to its lower-level bool_t
-   type, which *is* fixed-size.
- - Don't compare a bool variable against the literal, "true",
-   since a value with a logical non-false value need not be "1".
-   I.e., don't write "if (seen == true) ...".  Rather, write "if (seen)...".
-
-Of course, take all of the above with a grain of salt.  If you're about
-to use some system interface that requires a type like size_t, pid_t or
-off_t, use matching types for any corresponding variables.
-
-Also, if you try to use e.g., "unsigned int" as a type, and that
-conflicts with the signedness of a related variable, sometimes
-it's best just to use the *wrong* type, if "pulling the thread"
-and fixing all related variables would be too invasive.
-
-Finally, while using descriptive types is important, be careful not to
-go overboard.  If whatever you're doing causes warnings, or requires
-casts, then reconsider or ask for help.
+- If you're using "int" or "long", odds are good that there's a better type.
+
+- If a variable is counting something, be sure to declare it with an unsigned
+type.
+
+- If it's memory-size-related, use "size_t" (use "ssize_t" only if required).
+
+- If it's file-size related, use uintmax_t, or maybe "off_t".
+
+- If it's file-offset related (i.e., signed), use "off_t".
+
+- If it's just counting small numbers use "unsigned int"; (on all but oddball
+embedded systems, you can assume that that type is at least four bytes wide).
+
+- If a variable has boolean semantics, give it the "bool" type and use the
+corresponding "true" and "false" macros. It's ok to include <stdbool.h>, since
+libvirt's use of gnulib ensures that it exists and is usable.
+
+- In the unusual event that you require a specific width, use a standard type
+like "int32_t", "uint32_t", "uint64_t", etc.
+
+- While using "bool" is good for readability, it comes with minor caveats:
+
+-- Don't use "bool" in places where the type size must be constant across all
+systems, like public interfaces and on-the-wire protocols. Note that it would
+be possible (albeit wasteful) to use "bool" in libvirt's logical wire
+protocol, since XDR maps that to its lower-level "bool_t" type, which *is*
+fixed-size.
+
+-- Don't compare a bool variable against the literal, "true", since a value with
+a logical non-false value need not be "1". I.e., don't write "if (seen ==
+true) ...". Rather, write "if (seen)...".
+
+
+
+
+
+Of course, take all of the above with a grain of salt. If you're about to use
+some system interface that requires a type like "size_t", "pid_t" or "off_t",
+use matching types for any corresponding variables.
+
+Also, if you try to use e.g., "unsigned int" as a type, and that conflicts
+with the signedness of a related variable, sometimes it's best just to use the
+*wrong* type, if 'pulling the thread' and fixing all related variables would
+be too invasive.
+
+Finally, while using descriptive types is important, be careful not to go
+overboard. If whatever you're doing causes warnings, or requires casts, then
+reconsider or ask for help.
 
 Pointers
 --------
-Ensure that all of your pointers are "const-correct".
-Unless a pointer is used to modify the pointed-to storage,
-give it the "const" attribute.  That way, the reader knows
-up-front that this is a read-only pointer.  Perhaps more
-importantly, if we're diligent about this, when you see a non-const
-pointer, you're guaranteed that it is used to modify the storage
-it points to, or it is aliased to another pointer that is.
+Ensure that all of your pointers are 'const-correct'. Unless a pointer is used
+to modify the pointed-to storage, give it the "const" attribute. That way, the
+reader knows up-front that this is a read-only pointer. Perhaps more
+importantly, if we're diligent about this, when you see a non-const pointer,
+you're guaranteed that it is used to modify the storage it points to, or it is
+aliased to another pointer that is.
 
 
 Low level memory management
 ===========================
-
 Use of the malloc/free/realloc/calloc APIs is deprecated in the libvirt
-codebase, because they encourage a number of serious coding bugs and do
-not enable compile time verification of checks for NULL. Instead of these
+codebase, because they encourage a number of serious coding bugs and do not
+enable compile time verification of checks for NULL. Instead of these
 routines, use the macros from memory.h
 
-  - eg to allocate a single object:
+- e.g. to allocate a single object:
 
-      virDomainPtr domain;
+  virDomainPtr domain;
+
+  if (VIR_ALLOC(domain) < 0) {
+      virReportOOMError();
+      return NULL;
+  }
 
-      if (VIR_ALLOC(domain) < 0) {
-          virReportOOMError();
-          return NULL;
-      }
 
 
-  - eg to allocate an array of objects
+- e.g. to allocate an array of objects
 
-       virDomainPtr domains;
-       int ndomains = 10;
+  virDomainPtr domains;
+  int ndomains = 10;
+
+  if (VIR_ALLOC_N(domains, ndomains) < 0) {
+      virReportOOMError();
+      return NULL;
+  }
 
-       if (VIR_ALLOC_N(domains, ndomains) < 0) {
-           virReportOOMError();
-           return NULL;
-       }
 
-  - eg to allocate an array of object pointers
 
-       virDomainPtr *domains;
-       int ndomains = 10;
+- e.g. to allocate an array of object pointers
 
-       if (VIR_ALLOC_N(domains, ndomains) < 0) {
-           virReportOOMError();
-           return NULL;
-       }
+  virDomainPtr *domains;
+  int ndomains = 10;
 
-   - eg to re-allocate the array of domains to be longer
+  if (VIR_ALLOC_N(domains, ndomains) < 0) {
+      virReportOOMError();
+      return NULL;
+  }
+
+
+
+- e.g. to re-allocate the array of domains to be longer
+
+  ndomains = 20
+
+  if (VIR_REALLOC_N(domains, ndomains) < 0) {
+      virReportOOMError();
+      return NULL;
+  }
+
+
+
+- e.g. to free the domain
+
+  VIR_FREE(domain);
 
-       ndomains = 20
 
-       if (VIR_REALLOC_N(domains, ndomains) < 0) {
-           virReportOOMError();
-           return NULL;
-       }
 
-   - eg to free the domain
 
-       VIR_FREE(domain);
 
 
 File handling
 =============
-
 Use of the close() API is deprecated in libvirt code base to help avoiding
 double-closing of a file descriptor. Instead of this API, use the macro from
 files.h
 
-   - eg close a file descriptor
+- e.g. close a file descriptor
+
+  if (VIR_CLOSE(fd) < 0) {
+      virReportSystemError(errno, _("failed to close file"));
+  }
+
+
+
+- eg close a file descriptor in an error path, without losing the previous errno
+value
+
+  VIR_FORCE_CLOSE(fd);
+
+
 
-       if (VIR_CLOSE(fd) < 0) {
-           virReportSystemError(errno, _("failed to close file"));
-       }
 
-   - eg close a file descriptor in an error path, without losing the previous
-     errno value
 
-       VIR_FORCE_CLOSE(fd);
 
 String comparisons
 ==================
+Do not use the strcmp, strncmp, etc functions directly. Instead use one of the
+following semantically named macros
+
+- For strict equality:
+
+  STREQ(a,b)
+  STRNEQ(a,b)
+
+
+
+- For case insensitive equality:
+
+  STRCASEEQ(a,b)
+  STRCASENEQ(a,b)
+
+
 
-Do not use the strcmp, strncmp, etc functions directly. Instead use
-one of the following semantically named macros
+- For strict equality of a substring:
 
-  - For strict equality:
+  STREQLEN(a,b,n)
+  STRNEQLEN(a,b,n)
 
-     STREQ(a,b)
-     STRNEQ(a,b)
 
-  - For case insensitive equality:
-     STRCASEEQ(a,b)
-     STRCASENEQ(a,b)
 
-  - For strict equality of a substring:
+- For case insensitive equality of a substring:
 
-     STREQLEN(a,b,n)
-     STRNEQLEN(a,b,n)
+  STRCASEEQLEN(a,b,n)
+  STRCASENEQLEN(a,b,n)
 
-  - For case insensitive equality of a substring:
 
-     STRCASEEQLEN(a,b,n)
-     STRCASENEQLEN(a,b,n)
 
-  - For strict equality of a prefix:
+- For strict equality of a prefix:
+
+  STRPREFIX(a,b)
+
+
 
-     STRPREFIX(a,b)
 
 
 
 String copying
 ==============
+Do not use the strncpy function. According to the man page, it does *not*
+guarantee a NULL-terminated buffer, which makes it extremely dangerous to use.
+Instead, use one of the functionally equivalent functions:
 
-Do not use the strncpy function.  According to the man page, it does
-*not* guarantee a NULL-terminated buffer, which makes it extremely dangerous
-to use.  Instead, use one of the functionally equivalent functions:
+  virStrncpy(char *dest, const char *src, size_t n, size_t destbytes)
 
-  - virStrncpy(char *dest, const char *src, size_t n, size_t destbytes)
-      The first three arguments have the same meaning as for strncpy; namely the
-      destination, source, and number of bytes to copy, respectively.  The last
-      argument is the number of bytes available in the destination string; if a
-      copy of the source string (including a \0) will not fit into the
-      destination, no bytes are copied and the routine returns NULL.
-      Otherwise, n bytes from the source are copied into the destination and a
-      trailing \0 is appended.
+The first three arguments have the same meaning as for strncpy; namely the
+destination, source, and number of bytes to copy, respectively. The last
+argument is the number of bytes available in the destination string; if a copy
+of the source string (including a \0) will not fit into the destination, no
+bytes are copied and the routine returns NULL. Otherwise, n bytes from the
+source are copied into the destination and a trailing \0 is appended.
 
-  - virStrcpy(char *dest, const char *src, size_t destbytes)
-      Use this variant if you know you want to copy the entire src string
-      into dest.  Note that this is a macro, so arguments could be
-      evaluated more than once.  This is equivalent to
-      virStrncpy(dest, src, strlen(src), destbytes)
+  virStrcpy(char *dest, const char *src, size_t destbytes)
 
-  - virStrcpyStatic(char *dest, const char *src)
-      Use this variant if you know you want to copy the entire src string
-      into dest *and* you know that your destination string is a static string
-      (i.e. that sizeof(dest) returns something meaningful).  Note that
-      this is a macro, so arguments could be evaluated more than once.  This is
-      equivalent to virStrncpy(dest, src, strlen(src), sizeof(dest)).
+Use this variant if you know you want to copy the entire src string into dest.
+Note that this is a macro, so arguments could be evaluated more than once.
+This is equivalent to virStrncpy(dest, src, strlen(src), destbytes)
 
+  virStrcpyStatic(char *dest, const char *src)
+
+Use this variant if you know you want to copy the entire src string into dest
+*and* you know that your destination string is a static string (i.e. that
+sizeof(dest) returns something meaningful). Note that this is a macro, so
+arguments could be evaluated more than once. This is equivalent to
+virStrncpy(dest, src, strlen(src), sizeof(dest)).
 
 
 Variable length string buffer
 =============================
-
-If there is a need for complex string concatenations, avoid using
-the usual sequence of malloc/strcpy/strcat/snprintf functions and
-make use of the virBuffer API described in buf.h
+If there is a need for complex string concatenations, avoid using the usual
+sequence of malloc/strcpy/strcat/snprintf functions and make use of the
+virBuffer API described in buf.h
 
 eg typical usage is as follows:
 
   char *
-  somefunction(...) {
+  somefunction(...)
+  {
      virBuffer buf = VIR_BUFFER_INITIALIZER;
 
      ...
@@ -432,11 +467,9 @@ eg typical usage is as follows:
 
 Include files
 =============
-
-There are now quite a large number of include files, both libvirt
-internal and external, and system includes.  To manage all this
-complexity it's best to stick to the following general plan for all
-*.c source files:
+There are now quite a large number of include files, both libvirt internal and
+external, and system includes. To manage all this complexity it's best to
+stick to the following general plan for all *.c source files:
 
   /*
    * Copyright notice
@@ -461,59 +494,111 @@ complexity it's best to stick to the following general plan for all
   #include "util.h"               Any libvirt internal header files.
   #include "buf.h"
 
-  static myInternalFunc ()        The actual code.
+  static myInternalFunc()         The actual code.
   {
-    ...
+      ...
 
-Of particular note: *DO NOT* include libvirt/libvirt.h or
-libvirt/virterror.h.  It is included by "internal.h" already and there
-are some special reasons why you cannot include these files
-explicitly.
+Of particular note: *Do not* include libvirt/libvirt.h or libvirt/virterror.h.
+It is included by "internal.h" already and there are some special reasons why
+you cannot include these files explicitly.
 
 
 Printf-style functions
 ======================
+Whenever you add a new printf-style function, i.e., one with a format string
+argument and following "..." in its prototype, be sure to use gcc's printf
+attribute directive in the prototype. For example, here's the one for
+virAsprintf, in util.h:
+
+  int virAsprintf(char **strp, const char *fmt, ...)
+      ATTRIBUTE_FORMAT(printf, 2, 3);
+
+This makes it so gcc's -Wformat and -Wformat-security options can do their
+jobs and cross-check format strings with the number and types of arguments.
+
+
+Use of goto
+===========
+The use of goto is not forbidden, and goto is widely used throughout libvirt.
+While the uncontrolled use of goto will quickly lead to unmaintainable code,
+there is a place for it in well structured code where its use increases
+readability and maintainability. In general, if goto is used for error
+recovery, it's likely to be ok, otherwise, be cautious or avoid it all
+together.
 
-Whenever you add a new printf-style function, i.e., one with a format
-string argument and following "..." in its prototype, be sure to use
-gcc's printf attribute directive in the prototype.  For example, here's
-the one for virAsprintf, in util.h:
+The typical use of goto is to jump to cleanup code in the case of a long list
+of actions, any of which may fail and cause the entire operation to fail. In
+this case, a function will have a single label at the end of the function.
+It's almost always ok to use this style. In particular, if the cleanup code
+only involves free'ing memory, then having multiple labels is overkill.
+VIR_FREE() and every function named XXXFree() in libvirt is required to handle
+NULL as its arg. Thus you can safely call free on all the variables even if
+they were not yet allocated (yes they have to have been initialized to NULL).
+This is much simpler and clearer than having multiple labels.
 
-    int virAsprintf(char **strp, const char *fmt, ...)
-	ATTRIBUTE_FMT_PRINTF(2, 3);
+There are a couple of signs that a particular use of goto is not ok:
 
-This makes it so gcc's -Wformat and -Wformat-security options can do
-their jobs and cross-check format strings with the number and types
-of arguments.
+- You're using multiple labels. If you find yourself using multiple labels,
+you're strongly encouraged to rework your code to eliminate all but one of
+them.
 
+- The goto jumps back up to a point above the current line of code being
+executed. Please use some combination of looping constructs to re-execute code
+instead; it's almost certainly going to be more understandable by others. One
+well-known exception to this rule is restarting an i/o operation following
+EINTR.
 
+- The goto jumps down to an arbitrary place in the middle of a function followed
+by further potentially failing calls. You should almost certainly be using a
+conditional and a block instead of a goto. Perhaps some of your function's
+logic would be better pulled out into a helper function.
 
-                Libvirt committer guidelines
-                ============================
 
-The AUTHORS files indicates the list of people with commit access right
-who can actually merge the patches.
+
+Although libvirt does not encourage the Linux kernel wind/unwind style of
+multiple labels, there's a good general discussion of the issue archived at
+
+  KernelTrap
+  http://kerneltrap.org/node/553/2131
+
+When using goto, please use one of these standard labels if it makes sense:
+
+      error: A path only taken upon return with an error code
+    cleanup: A path taken upon return with success code + optional error
+  no_memory: A path only taken upon return with an OOM error code
+      retry: If needing to jump upwards (eg retry on EINTR)
+
+
+Libvirt committer guidelines
+============================
+The AUTHORS files indicates the list of people with commit access right who
+can actually merge the patches.
 
 The general rule for committing a patch is to make sure it has been reviewed
-properly in the mailing-list first, usually if a couple of people gave an
-ACK or +1 to a patch and nobody raised an objection on the list it should
-be good to go. If the patch touches a part of the code where you're not the
-main maintainer or not have a very clear idea of how things work, it's better
-to wait for a more authoritative feedback though. Before committing please
-also rebuild locally and run 'make check syntax-check' and make sure they
-don't raise error. Try to look for warnings too for example configure with
-   --enable-compile-warnings=error
+properly in the mailing-list first, usually if a couple of people gave an ACK
+or +1 to a patch and nobody raised an objection on the list it should be good
+to go. If the patch touches a part of the code where you're not the main
+maintainer, or where you do not have a very clear idea of how things work,
+it's better to wait for a more authoritative feedback though. Before
+committing, please also rebuild locally, run 'make check syntax-check', and
+make sure you don't raise errors. Try to look for warnings too; for example,
+configure with
+
+  --enable-compile-warnings=error
+
 which adds -Werror to compile flags, so no warnings get missed
 
-Exceptions to that 'review and approval on the list first' is fixing failures
-to build:
-  - if a recently committed patch breaks compilation on a platform
-    or for a given driver then it's fine to commit a minimal fix
-    directly without getting the review feedback first
-  - similarly, if make check or make syntax-check breaks, if there is
-    an obvious fix, it's fine to commit immediately
-The patch should still be sent to the list (or tell what the fix was if
-trivial) and 'make check syntax-check' should pass too before committing
-anything
-Similar fixes for documentation and code comments can be managed
-in the same way, but still make sure they get reviewed if non-trivial.
+An exception to 'review and approval on the list first' is fixing failures to
+build:
+
+- if a recently committed patch breaks compilation on a platform or for a given
+driver, then it's fine to commit a minimal fix directly without getting the
+review feedback first
+
+- if make check or make syntax-check breaks, if there is an obvious fix, it's
+fine to commit immediately. The patch should still be sent to the list (or
+tell what the fix was if trivial), and 'make check syntax-check' should pass
+too, before committing anything
+
+- fixes for documentation and code comments can be managed in the same way, but
+still make sure they get reviewed if non-trivial.
diff --git a/Makefile.am b/Makefile.am
index d05b7da..1a23229 100644
--- a/Makefile.am
+++ b/Makefile.am
@@ -56,6 +56,15 @@ NEWS: $(top_srcdir)/docs/news.xsl $(top_srcdir)/docs/news.html.in
 	   | perl -pe 's/[ \t]+$$//'				\
 	   > $ -t && mv $ -t $@ ; fi );
 
+syntax-check: $(top_srcdir)/HACKING
+
+$(top_srcdir)/HACKING: $(top_srcdir)/docs/hacking1.xsl $(top_srcdir)/docs/hacking2.xsl \
+                       $(top_srcdir)/docs/wrapstring.xsl $(top_srcdir)/docs/hacking.html.in
+	-@(if [ -x $(XSLTPROC) ] ; then \
+	   $(XSLTPROC) --nonet $(top_srcdir)/docs/hacking1.xsl $(top_srcdir)/docs/hacking.html.in | \
+	   $(XSLTPROC) --nonet $(top_srcdir)/docs/hacking2.xsl - \
+	   | perl -0777 -pe 's/\n\n+$$/\n/' \
+	   > $ -t && mv $ -t $@ ; fi );
 
 rpm: clean
 	@(unset CDPATH ; $(MAKE) dist && rpmbuild -ta $(distdir).tar.gz)
diff --git a/docs/hacking1.xsl b/docs/hacking1.xsl
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..982fa8d
--- /dev/null
+++ b/docs/hacking1.xsl
@@ -0,0 +1,28 @@
+<?xml version="1.0"?>
+<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform";>
+
+<xsl:output method="xml" encoding="UTF-8" indent="no"/>
+
+
+
+<xsl:template match="/">
+  <xsl:apply-templates/>
+</xsl:template>
+
+
+
+<xsl:template match="@*|node()">
+  <xsl:copy>
+    <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
+  </xsl:copy>
+</xsl:template>
+
+
+
+<!-- resolve b/i/code tags in a first pass, because they interfere with line
+     wrapping in the second pass -->
+<xsl:template match="b">*<xsl:apply-templates/>*</xsl:template>
+<xsl:template match="i">'<xsl:apply-templates/>'</xsl:template>
+<xsl:template match="code">"<xsl:apply-templates/>"</xsl:template>
+
+</xsl:stylesheet>
diff --git a/docs/hacking2.xsl b/docs/hacking2.xsl
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..89e777b
--- /dev/null
+++ b/docs/hacking2.xsl
@@ -0,0 +1,146 @@
+<?xml version="1.0"?>
+<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform";>
+
+<xsl:import href="wrapstring.xsl"/>
+
+<xsl:output method="text" encoding="UTF-8" indent="no"/>
+
+<xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>
+
+
+
+<xsl:variable name="newline">
+<xsl:text>
+</xsl:text>
+</xsl:variable>
+
+
+
+<xsl:template match="/">
+<xsl:text>-*- buffer-read-only: t -*- vi: set ro:
+DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE!  IT IS GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY!
+
+
+
+</xsl:text>
+<xsl:apply-templates/>
+</xsl:template>
+
+
+
+<!-- title -->
+<xsl:template match="h1">
+<xsl:text>                         </xsl:text>
+<xsl:value-of select="normalize-space(.)"/>
+<xsl:text>
+                         </xsl:text>======================
+</xsl:template>
+
+
+
+<!-- output the current text node underlined -->
+<xsl:template name="underline">
+  <xsl:param name="text" select="normalize-space(.)"/>
+  <xsl:param name="text-length" select="string-length($text)"/>
+  <xsl:param name="char" select="'='"/>
+  <xsl:param name="line" select="$char"/>
+  <xsl:choose>
+    <xsl:when test="$text-length > 1">
+      <xsl:call-template name="underline">
+        <xsl:with-param name="text" select="$text"/>
+        <xsl:with-param name="text-length" select="$text-length - 1"/>
+        <xsl:with-param name="char" select="$char"/>
+        <xsl:with-param name="line" select="concat($line,$char)"/>
+      </xsl:call-template>
+    </xsl:when>
+    <xsl:otherwise>
+<xsl:value-of select="$text"/>
+<xsl:value-of select="$newline"/>
+<xsl:value-of select="$line"/>
+<xsl:value-of select="$newline"/>
+    </xsl:otherwise>
+  </xsl:choose>
+</xsl:template>
+
+
+
+<xsl:template match="h2">
+<xsl:value-of select="$newline"/>
+<xsl:call-template name="underline"/>
+</xsl:template>
+
+
+
+<xsl:template match="h3">
+<xsl:call-template name="underline">
+<xsl:with-param name="char" select="'-'"/>
+</xsl:call-template>
+</xsl:template>
+
+
+
+<!-- output text line wrapped at 80 chars -->
+<xsl:template match="text()">
+<xsl:call-template name="wrap-string">
+<xsl:with-param name="str" select="normalize-space(.)"/>
+<xsl:with-param name="wrap-col" select="80"/>
+<xsl:with-param name="break-mark" select="$newline"/>
+</xsl:call-template>
+</xsl:template>
+
+
+
+<xsl:template match="ol|ul|p">
+<xsl:apply-templates/><xsl:value-of select="$newline"/><xsl:value-of select="$newline"/>
+</xsl:template>
+
+
+
+<xsl:template match="ol/li">
+<xsl:choose>
+<xsl:when test=".//node()[position()=last()]/self::pre">(<xsl:value-of select="position()"/>) <xsl:apply-templates/>
+</xsl:when>
+<!-- only append two newlines when the last element isn't a pre element -->
+<xsl:otherwise>(<xsl:value-of select="position()"/>) <xsl:apply-templates/><xsl:value-of select="$newline"/><xsl:value-of select="$newline"/>
+</xsl:otherwise>
+</xsl:choose>
+</xsl:template>
+
+
+
+<xsl:template match="ul/li">- <xsl:apply-templates/><xsl:value-of select="$newline"/><xsl:value-of select="$newline"/>
+</xsl:template>
+
+
+
+<xsl:template match="li/ul/li">-- <xsl:apply-templates/><xsl:value-of select="$newline"/><xsl:value-of select="$newline"/>
+</xsl:template>
+
+
+
+<!-- add newline before nested <ul> -->
+<xsl:template match="li/ul"><xsl:value-of select="$newline"/><xsl:value-of select="$newline"/><xsl:apply-templates/>
+</xsl:template>
+
+
+
+<xsl:template match="pre">
+<xsl:choose>
+<xsl:when test="starts-with(.,'&#xA;')"><xsl:value-of select="substring(.,2)"/><xsl:value-of select="$newline"/>
+</xsl:when>
+<xsl:otherwise>
+<xsl:value-of select="."/><xsl:value-of select="$newline"/>
+</xsl:otherwise>
+</xsl:choose>
+</xsl:template>
+
+
+
+<xsl:template match="a">
+<xsl:value-of select="$newline"/><xsl:value-of select="$newline"/>
+<xsl:text>  </xsl:text><xsl:apply-templates/>
+<xsl:value-of select="$newline"/>
+<xsl:text>  </xsl:text><xsl:value-of select="@href"/>
+</xsl:template>
+
+</xsl:stylesheet>
diff --git a/docs/wrapstring.xsl b/docs/wrapstring.xsl
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..b468a70
--- /dev/null
+++ b/docs/wrapstring.xsl
@@ -0,0 +1,56 @@
+<?xml version="1.0"?>
+<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform";>
+
+<!-- based on http://plasmasturm.org/log/xslwordwrap/ -->
+<!-- Copyright 2010 Aristotle Pagaltzis; under the MIT licence -->
+<!-- http://www.opensource.org/licenses/mit-license.php -->
+<xsl:template name="wrap-string">
+  <xsl:param name="str" />
+  <xsl:param name="wrap-col" />
+  <xsl:param name="break-mark" />
+  <xsl:param name="pos" select="0" />
+  <xsl:choose>
+    <xsl:when test="contains( $str, ' ' )">
+      <xsl:variable name="first-word" select="substring-before( $str, ' ' )" />
+      <xsl:variable name="pos-now" select="$pos + 1 + string-length( $first-word )" />
+      <xsl:choose>
+        <xsl:when test="$pos > 0 and $pos-now >= $wrap-col">
+          <xsl:copy-of select="$break-mark" />
+          <xsl:call-template name="wrap-string">
+            <xsl:with-param name="str" select="$str" />
+            <xsl:with-param name="wrap-col" select="$wrap-col" />
+            <xsl:with-param name="break-mark" select="$break-mark" />
+            <xsl:with-param name="pos" select="0" />
+          </xsl:call-template>
+        </xsl:when>
+        <xsl:otherwise>
+          <xsl:if test="$pos > 0">
+            <xsl:text> </xsl:text>
+          </xsl:if>
+          <xsl:value-of select="$first-word" />
+          <xsl:call-template name="wrap-string">
+            <xsl:with-param name="str" select="substring-after( $str, ' ' )" />
+            <xsl:with-param name="wrap-col" select="$wrap-col" />
+            <xsl:with-param name="break-mark" select="$break-mark" />
+            <xsl:with-param name="pos" select="$pos-now" />
+          </xsl:call-template>
+        </xsl:otherwise>
+      </xsl:choose>
+    </xsl:when>
+    <xsl:otherwise>
+      <xsl:choose>
+        <xsl:when test="$pos + string-length( $str ) >= $wrap-col">
+          <xsl:copy-of select="$break-mark" />
+        </xsl:when>
+        <xsl:otherwise>
+          <xsl:if test="$pos > 0">
+            <xsl:text> </xsl:text>
+          </xsl:if>
+        </xsl:otherwise>
+      </xsl:choose>
+      <xsl:value-of select="$str" />
+    </xsl:otherwise>
+  </xsl:choose>
+</xsl:template>
+
+</xsl:stylesheet>
-- 
1.7.0.4


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