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[linux-lvm] Renaming Volume Groups.



Hi,

I come from an HPUX lvm background.  In my time I've had to recover all
sorts of LVM foul ups.   

I'm a bit surprised at the way LVM on linux appears to work. 

I read the post from Axel Braun with the  
Subject: [linux-lvm] LVM2 on a USB-disk/ same VG name 
on Thu, 9 Mar 2006 09:59:22 +0100 (MET)

If I read things correctly. To rescue data from dead system in his case
a laptop.  He encountered the problem that both his current disk Volume
Group is called VolGroup00 and the Lap Top disk is also called
VolGroup00.  

The solution appears to be rename VolGroup00 the working system
VolGroup00 then you can import the laptop VolGroup00.

With my HPUX lvm hat on this seems really bad.  I just had a quick go at
doing something similar on a Fedora Core 4 system.  i.e. rename
VolGroup00.  I changed /etc/fstab and /etc/grub.conf replacing
VolGroup00 with vg00 (that makes an HPUX person very happy :-)
Booted the rescue disk but alas it doesn't appear to know about LVM.  
So I can't vgrename. <sigh>

Now my disk it hosed.  It won't boot.

Using the rescue disk I edited /boot/grub/grub.conf then when I booted I
was thown a rescue shell that allowed me to remount the / filesystem
read/write I fixed /etc/fstab and now the system is bootable again.

However, I still can't activate the other VolGroup00 disk.

Are there any plans for a tool that can do a vgrename given a list of
devices?

When I connect my Laptop drive via USB as Axel did is is /dev/sdf and
and VolGroup00 is /dev/sdf2.  So what I'd like to be able to do is :-

#  vgfixname /dev/sdf2 VolGroup01
#  vgscan
#  vgchange -a y 

Regards,
Tom.


-- 
There are 10 types of people in the world.
Those that understand Binary and those that don't.

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