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Re: [OS:N:] SCO Looks For Intellectual-Property Claim On Linux



anyone consider the direction might not be Linux
but Mr. Bill - after all some others on this list have
suggested that current and past versions of his
stuff have used BSD and SCO(?) code...

On Tuesday 28 January 2003 19:12, Jeremy Hogan wrote:
> Daniel,
>
> Others are confused by this as well. From various SCO sources and
> speculation it looks like this:
>
> 1) SCO owns some UNIX IP, they say they wish to license for SCO apps to
> run on Linux.
>
> 2) Much of what is in Linux, that could be derivative of any UNIX is
> from BSD and resolved long ago.
>
> 3) SCO was/is part of a company sharing Linux code. Therefore, they
> themselves would have shipped an IP violation if such a violation
> existed. And did so under the GPL. Doubtful they would win in such a
> suit against all of Linux.
>
> 4) The wording of the first leak of their intent was considered
> confrontational, hiring Boies as their IP lawyer fueled this.
>
> 5) Folks seem to think Linux is safe from suits not having any
> connection with SCO libs, and SCO has said as much.
>
> 6) You still never know.
>
> It's not clear whether their initial intent was/is to scare folks into
> paying for use of the libraries just in case, or to make it easier to
> port SCO apps to each Linux distro.
>
> They have stated their intentions are exploratory and honorable multiple
> times. See #6.
>
> --jeremy
>
> On Tue, 2003-01-28 at 19:37, danultra softhome net wrote:
> > Hi all,
> >
> > Umm, I have a few thoughts on this...
> >
> > > "The most substantial intellectual property in Unix comes
> > > from SCO," Chris Sontag, senior vice president for
> > > SCOsource, said in a statement. "While Linux is an open-=20
> > > source product, it shares philosophy, architecture, and
> > > APIs with Unix. SCO will help customers legitimately combine
> > > Linux and Unix technology to run thousands of Unix
> > > applications."
> >
> > I'm a littl unsure here of SCO's intentions.  Is SCO merely concerned
> > with its patents on people attempting to use its own APIs on Linux-based
> > systems, or is it seeking royalties based on some aspect of the Linux
> > kernel itself?
> >
> > This is immensely confusing.  What about GNU/Hurd?  Does SCO think it
> > owns patents on aspects of it?  What about *BSD?  Why single out 'Linux'.
> >
> > I don't want to get into a debate here about 'Linux' vs 'GNU/Linux', but
> > really, SCO is making itself very unclear - by itself, this announcement
> > seems to imply some concern with the Linux kernel itself.  Does anyone
> > know of more detailed information on this?  This announcement, whilst
> > worrying, is also rather vague
> >
> > > As open-source software, volunteers have developed Linux
> > > over the years. Most Linux users have assumed the operating
> > > system, built by a team of developers headed by Linus
> > > Torvalds, did not involve proprietary technology from Bell
> > > Labs.
> >
> > Linux (both as a kernel, and as an operating system, with GNU) does _not_
> > involve proprietary technology from Bell Labs.  Not a speck of code. 
> > What is the point of the above paragraph, then?  It seems to imply that
> > Linux contains proprietary technology, yet it doesn't.  Am I the only one
> > who is somewhat confused, here?
> >
> > Daniel Carter
> > Free Software enthusiast
> >
> >
> >
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