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Re: [Osdc-edu-authors] Potential post on copyright assignment



Mel,

and BTW,

        Open Access Week is upon us:

       http://www.openaccessweek.org/

                      October 23-30

with some humor:

http://www.openaccessweek.org/video/go-open-access-iii-who-s-got-access-to-scholarly-information
http://www.openaccessweek.org/video/go-open-access-iv-academics-for-sale


--

   Luis


-----------------------------------------------------------------
On Wed, Aug 24, 2011 at 8:17 PM, Luis Ibanez <luis ibanez kitware com> wrote:
> Mel,
>
> Here is a talk from Larry Lessig that you probably will
> appreciate:
>
>                 http://vimeo.com/22633948
>
> "Lecture at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland, 18 April 2011:
> A new talk about open access to academic or scientific
> information, with a bit of commentary about YouTube
> Copyright School."
>
>
> It is a nice summary of all that is wrong with scientific
> and technical societies becoming publishing houses,
> and pursuing profit instead of working on their original
> mission of disseminating knowledge.
>
>
> As usual, all mischief is exposed when you follow
> the money trail. See for example this report from
> the Welcome Trust:
>
>        "Economic Analysis of
>         Scientific Research Publishing"
>
> http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/About-us/Publications/Reports/Biomedical-science/wtd003181.htm
>
> http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/stellent/groups/corporatesite/@policy_communications/documents/web_document/wtd003182.pdf
>
>
> "This report provides a comprehensive analysis of an
>  industry that generates some £22 billion annually."...
>
> After reading the report, the next stop is to pay
> a visit to the librarian of your University, where
> most likely you will find that the library no longer
> is focused in hosting books but rather it has
> become a licensing clearing house, where they
> pay publishers for allowing you to login into their
> online sites when you are inside of the university
> network.
>
> Journals subscriptions are bought by Universities
> the same way that you get channels in cable TV.
> Publishers bundle together "packages" of journals,
> that of course include a couple of important journals
> and a dozen of others that you don't care much about.
>
> Subscription prices had increases at three times
> the rate of inflation. Hard to explain in an industry
> that acquires its content for free (as you will have
> noticed by the $0 check you got when transferring
> your copyright to the Journal where you submitted it).
>
> [ ...more about that point in Lessig talk above...]
>
> ----
>
> But, there is hope:    Open Access is here
>
> The Welcome Trust is one of the strongest supporters
> of Open Access publishing. They realize that, if they
> are funding the research work, they (or any one else)
> should not have to pay to read the results that are
> published in Journals from projects that they have
> funded.
>
> http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/About-us/Policy/Spotlight-issues/Open-access/index.htm
>
> Other real scientific organization
> have also Open Access policies.
>
> For example the Howard Huges Medical Institute:
>
> http://www.hhmi.org/about/research/policies.html#sharing
>
> Policy on Public Access Publishing:
> http://www.hhmi.org/about/research/sc320.pdf
>
> ---
>
>
> Open Access publishers are natural allies of Open Source.
> See for example the PLoS policy on articles that include
> software:
>
> http://www.plosone.org/static/guidelines.action
>
>
> "Deposition with the journal as well as an Open Source archive ensures
> that the original source associated with the paper is available as
> well as any enhancements made after the paper is published. If the
> article covers a well established project that has been providing an
> open source code repository for an extended amount of time, it can
> also be considered.
>
> A condition of acceptance is that the software can be run by reviewers
> accessing the public software and that results presented in the paper
> are reproducible. The software only need run on one hardware/software
> platform in common use by the readership (including Matlab), although
> it must run without dependencies on proprietary or otherwise
> unobtainable ancillary software. Articles describing software that
> requires access to databases and other resources whose persistence is
> not guaranteed (e.g., individual laboratory databases without funding
> support) will not be considered."
>
>
> ---
>
>
>       Luis
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------
> On Sat, Aug 20, 2011 at 2:02 AM, Mel Chua <mel redhat com> wrote:
>> So, I started grad school. And boy, is life different here on the academic
>> side of things. Copyright, for instance. When you publish in an academic
>> forum, you sign over everything to the journal. Everything.
>>
>> As far as I can tell, this means I've screwed up. My first couple
>> co-submissions of work on teaching open source are, ironically, *unable* to
>> be open-licensed.
>>
>> The post below is quite naive, but represents my first foray into copyright
>> assignment policies for articles -- this might be something to cross-post to
>> the legal channel when it's done.
>>
>> http://blog.melchua.com/2011/08/20/in-which-mel-is-saddened-and-bewildered-by-academic-copyright-assignments/
>>
>> I think it'd be good to get an actual lawyer to look at this and possibly
>> rectify some (as-of-yet undiscovered) points of my ignorance, and maybe one
>> of the professors on this list can write a counterpoint from what this looks
>> like once you're more seasoned on the academic circuit -- is everyone as
>> bothered by this as I am, or is it something you shrug and get jaded to,
>> or... am I missing something?
>>
>> Thoughts?
>>
>> --Mel
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Osdc-edu-authors mailing list
>> Osdc-edu-authors redhat com
>> https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/osdc-edu-authors
>>
>


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