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Re: Find out where a mount point is physically located?



That worked, I think the vendor screwed up. Thank you for the tip! I Never
knew df could take a file as an argument :) I really should read manpages
more.

On Fri, Oct 29, 2010 at 11:33 AM, Ken Rossman <wkrossman gmail com> wrote:

> On Oct 29, 2010, at 11:21 AM, Matty Sarro wrote:
>
> > Greetings everyone!
> > I'm hoping this isn't too noobish of a question.
> > Right now I am working on a server that was configured to a vendor's
> specs.
> > The vendor then came on site, and deployed their software onto the
> server.
> > However, there were some extra partitions that we'd created for the
> > installation and I'm not sure that they were actually used. In / there is
> > now a mount point called /u1. Is there any way that I can correlate that
> > back to a particular device on the system? I tried df -h and it isn't
> really
> > helping.
>
> There may be a better way, but I was always partial to something like this:
>
>  # cd /u1
>  # df .
>
> This should show you whether the partition is root or some other partition.
> The physical device will be listed on the left, the mount point on the
> right.
>
> KR
>
>
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