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Re: Fedora lifetime and stability



On Mon, 2007-11-12 at 00:52 -0800, Kam Leo wrote:
> On Nov 10, 2007 12:52 AM, Gilboa Davara <gilboad gmail com> wrote:
> > On Sat, 2007-11-10 at 10:41 +0200, Gilboa Davara wrote:
> > > On Thu, 2007-11-08 at 07:32 -0800, Serguei Miridonov wrote:
> > > > Hello,
> > > >
> > > > I have some remarks about Fedora lifetime and stability which
> > > > are very important for general users. Now and in the past
> > > > there were some issues with Fedora upgrades which turned life
> > > > into nightmare when instead of doing normal work users had to
> > > > fight with bugs, sending reports, waiting fixes, etc.
> > > >
> > > > I think that it might be a good idea to increase the time
> > > > between Fedora releases and/or make the lifetime of every
> > > > release at least 2-3 years.
> > > >
> > > > However, before starting a discussion about this I would like
> > > > to ask, if this topic was discussed earlier. I'm sure it was
> > > > but can somebody point me any deep analysis which really
> > > > proves that current one year lifetime and half-year release
> > > > period is the best for Fedora?
> > > >
> > > > Thank you in advance.
> > > >
> > > > Serguei.
> > > >
> > >
> > > No deep analysis required:
> > > Short term support (1 year), bleeding edge: Fedora.
> > > Long term support (7 years), slow moving: RHEL (and CentOS).
> > >
> > > - Gilboa
> >
> > Let me try and explain myself.
> > You cannot have a stable platform that is also bleeding edge.
> > As any software developer can tell you, software needs time to mature.
> > You need time to check everything, fix bugs, fix compatibility problems,
> > etc.
> >
> > Ubuntu long term support is problematic. You get a semi-unstable release
> > that is slowly being stabilized as things progress. But until it fully
> > stabilizes, the software packages being used as just as old as
> > RHEL/CentOS ones.
> 
> Why do you say long term support is problematic? Per their web page
> 18 months is the standard support term for the desktop and server
> releases. Plus they offer special long term support (LTS ) releases;
> desktop (3 years) and server (5 years). They're all free and under one
> umbrella. That beats the heck out of what Fedora/Red Hat is offering.
> (I'm not counting CentOS as a free Red Hat supported offering.)

Because the release itself is semi-stable to begin with.
Yes, you get 18/36/60 month support cycle - but unlike RHEL/CentOS it
doesn't have a long term beta/staging program. (AKA Fedora)

> 
> > ... In essence, instead of having RedHat/CentOS do the QA for you (or
> > use Fedora to pre-test it), you are being used as Ubuntu's QA
> 
> It's a community QA for the bulk of the software. GNU software, Gnome,
> KDE, Openoffice, etc. are all from the same place.
> 

True.

But if I use RHEL or CentOS in a production environment, I already know
that it has went through a long QA cycle, both as Fedora and as RHEL
beta/RC/etc.

- Gilboa


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