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The Enterprisers Project ran a story last week that delves into some of the lesser known qualities of Kubernetes Operators. Read the whole thing here. From the article:

3. Kubernetes Operators aren’t just for databases

A (very) brief history of Kubernetes Operators goes something like this: In its early days, Kubernetes was considered a great fit for managing stateless applications. For stateful applications like databases, not so much – at least not without significant operational burden. Operators to the rescue.

(Again, that’s the CliffsNotes version.)

So Operators in their early days were often focused on database applications and helping to extend Kubernetes’ capabilities to this critical category. Bromhead from Instaclustr led the development of an Operator for Apache Cassandra, for example.

“Back when Kubernetes Operators started, people would create Operators mostly for managing stateful database workloads,” says Yossi Jana, DevOps team leader at AllCloud. “Some of the examples were MongoDB, Cassandra, and Redis. Those databases are more difficult to set up and continuously manage on your own without the proper expertise.”

So, yes, if you scan the OperatorHub.io registry, you’ll see plenty of database-related Operators. But Operators aren’t for databases alone.


About the author

Red Hatter since 2018, technology historian and founder of The Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment. Two decades of journalism mixed with technology expertise, storytelling and oodles of computing experience from inception to ewaste recycling. I have taught or had my work used in classes at USF, SFSU, AAU, UC Law Hastings and Harvard Law. 

I have worked with the EFF, Stanford, MIT, and Archive.org to brief the US Copyright Office and change US copyright law. We won multiple exemptions to the DMCA, accepted and implemented by the Librarian of Congress. My writings have appeared in Wired, Bloomberg, Make Magazine, SD Times, The Austin American Statesman, The Atlanta Journal Constitution and many other outlets.

I have been written about by the Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Wired and The Atlantic. I have been called "The Gertrude Stein of Video Games," an honor I accept, as I live less than a mile from her childhood home in Oakland, CA. I was project lead on the first successful institutional preservation and rebooting of the first massively multiplayer game, Habitat, for the C64, from 1986: https://neohabitat.org . I've consulted and collaborated with the NY MOMA, the Oakland Museum of California, Cisco, Semtech, Twilio, Game Developers Conference, NGNX, the Anti-Defamation League, the Library of Congress and the Oakland Public Library System on projects, contracts, and exhibitions.

 
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