In-Person Event

Microservices Day Atlanta 2019

1월 16, 2019Atlanta, GAThe Garage at Tech Square

WAIT LIST REGISTRATION ONLY

This event has reached capacity, and we will be unable to confirm your registration at this time. However, you may still register to add your name to the wait list.

Microservices Day, Atlanta 2019, is about real world microservices implementations from testing to managing data to choosing the right tools and ecosystem.

In March of 2014, James Lewis and Martin Fowler of ThoughtWorks brought the term “microservices architecture” into the mainstream. Five years later, microservices architecture is quickly becoming the enterprise standard for greenfield applications.

Techniques and tools have sprung up to enable and ease adoption and to address the pain points and missteps encountered by early adopters. At Red Hat’s 3rd annual Microservices Day, Atlanta 2019, you will:

  • Find out which DevOps strategies are required for success
  • Learn how to handle data with CQRS
  • Discover when, where, and how to fit in serverless applications
  • Review event-driven and Reactive application design
  • Hear from the experts about the best practices to create front ends for MSA applications

Previous Microservices Day events have sold out, so be sure to register early to reserve your spot.

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

8:30–9:15 a.m.

Registration

9:15–10:00 a.m.

A DevOps State of Mind: Managing Microservices and Databases with Kubernetes

Chris Van Tuin

chief technologist, NA West, Red Hat

10:15–11:00 a.m.

Event-Driven Microservices with Kafka, Kubernetes, and Camel

Marius Bogoevici

principal specialist solution architect, Red Hat

11:15 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Microservices Data Patterns: CQRS and Event Sourcing with Kafka and Eclipse Vert.x

Edson Yanaga

director of developer experience, Red Hat

12:00–1:00 p.m.

Lunch

1:00–1:45 p.m.

Akka and Kubernetes: The beginning of a beautiful relationship

Hugh McKee

developer advocate, Lightbend

2:00–2:45 p.m.

Front Matter: Next Level Front End Deployments on OpenShift

Lance Ball

principal software engineer, Red Hat

3:00–3:45 p.m.

Strategies, Techniques, and Toolkits for Testing Microservices

Ram Maddali

senior solutions architect, Red Hat

4:00–4:45 p.m.

Serverless or Serverfull: Microservices^Functions

Rafael Benevides

director of developer experience, Red Hat

4:45–6:00 p.m.

Networking Happy Hour

Abstracts

A DevOps State of Mind: Managing Microservices and Databases with Kubernetes

Chris Van Tuin

Rapid innovation, changing business landscapes, and new IT demands often force businesses to make changes quickly. In the eyes of many, DevOps, microservices, and containers are at the brink of becoming pervasive in IT to accelerate business innovation. In this session, you'll learn about managing containerized microservices and databases at scale:

  • Best practices for immutable and secure container images
  • Deployment strategies for microservices including Recreate, Rolling, Blue/Green, A/B testing with Canaries
  • Managing database migrations in a CI/CD pipeline

Event-Driven Microservices with Kafka, Kubernetes, and Camel

Marius Bogoevici

Event-centric design and event-driven architecture are powerful tools for designing scalable, distributed systems that are capable of taking advantage of the agility and organizational efficiencies promised by microservices. To build such an architecture you need a reliable and scalable messaging system (Kafka), a powerful programming model (Camel), and a platform where they can run reliably and resiliently (Kubernetes). In this session, you will see how these three technologies complement each other and deliver a cohesive solution.

Microservices Data Patterns: CQRS and Event Sourcing with Kafka and Eclipse Vert.x

Edson Yanaga

“One size does not fit all.” And this is still especially true for your distributed data. Different types of data require different approaches in how you distribute and manipulate it.

Update frequency? Staleness? Push or pull? Legacy or new? Cache or direct read? Event sourcing? Business or low-level events? Check out this session to see how different technologies, such as data virtualization, change data capture, in-memory data grids, reactive programming, and much more can be applied to solve a plethora of different data scenarios with different requirements.

Akka and Kubernetes: The beginning of a beautiful relationship

Hugh McKee

One of the best features of Akka is Akka Cluster. Akka Cluster allows for building distributed applications, where one application or service spans multiple nodes. From its initial release in 2013, Akka Cluster needed a node management system to manage the Akka nodes and to provide resilience and elasticity. With Kubernetes, Akka finally has a node management system. Akka Cluster has been designed to gracefully handle nodes leaving and joining a running cluster while continuing to run. Kubernetes adds and removes nodes, as needed, to increase capacity or to recover from failures. In effect, there is a perfect symbiosis between Akka Cluster and Kubernetes. In this session, we will look at and demonstrate how Akka Cluster and Kubernetes work together and how together they form a beautiful relationship.

Front Matter: Next Level Front-End Deployments on OpenShift

Lance Ball

Your team builds applications. You’ve done it for years and have a good thing going. Not only that, but you're on top of your game with modern development patterns. You write microservices and utilize message queues, but applications aren’t just the backend. There is almost always a front end between the user and the server-side bits. In the brave new world of Kubernetes and containerized deployments, how does the front end best fit into the mix? Maybe you’re used to just copying your files up to the web server and forgetting about it. But that’s not going to fly anymore. In this session, I will show you tips, tricks, and best practices for building and deploying your front-end applications on Red Hat’s OpenShift Kubernetes platform.

Strategies, Techniques, and Toolkits for Testing Microservices

Ram Maddali

Testing microservices is significantly more nuanced and complex than testing a traditional monolithic application, but it is one of the key ingredients for successful continuous delivery. An effective test strategy needs to account for both testing individual services in isolation and the verification of overall system behavior. This session will cover the strategies and techniques including TDD for building unit, component, integration, contract tests using live examples with different frameworks like Junit5, Arquillian, Hoverfly, and Spock.

Serverless or Serverfull: Microservices^Functions

Rafael Benevides

In this session, we will primarily focus on OpenWhisk, an open source FaaS (Function-as-a-Service) engine, layered on top of Kubernetes, and integrating numerous cloud hosted and "on-premise" services. “Serverless” is a misnomer. Your future cloud-native applications will consist of both microservices and functions—often wrapped up as Linux containers, but in many cases that developers may ignore—and the operational aspects of managing that infrastructure.

Date: January 16, 2019

Time: 8:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Location:
The Garage at Tech Square, 848 Spring St NW, Atlanta, GA 30308

Complimentary Parking is available at the Centergy Parking Deck for all attendees. Vouchers will be provided at registration.

The closest MARTA stop is the Midtown Transit Station.

Lance Ball

Red Hat

Lance Ball

principal software engineer, Red Hat

2:00–2:45 p.m.

Lance is a principal software engineer at Red Hat, leading the Node.js engineering efforts within Red Hat Middleware. He is an active open source contributor, an author of several NPM modules, and a core committer for the Node.js project. In addition to Node.js, you'll find his contributions in many other well-known open source projects, including: Wildfly Swarm, Vert.x, and Torquebox.

Rafael Benevides

Red Hat

Rafael Benevides

director of developer experience, Red Hat

4:00–4:45 p.m.

Rafael Benevides is director of developer experience at Red Hat. With many years of experience in several fields of the IT industry, he helps developers and companies all over the world to be more effective in software development. Rafael considers himself a problem solver who has a big love for sharing. He is a member of Apache DeltaSpike PMC, a Duke’s Choice Award-winning project, and a speaker in conferences like JavaOne, Devoxx, TDC, DevNexus and many more. Twitter: @rafabene | LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/rafaelbenevides/ | Blog: www.rafabene.com

Edson Yanaga

Red Hat

Edson Yanaga

director of developer experience, Red Hat

11:15 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Edson Yanaga, Red Hat's director of developer experience, is a Java champion and a Microsoft MVP. He is also a published author and a frequent speaker at international conferences, discussing Java, microservices, cloud computing, DevOps, and software craftsmanship.

Edson considers himself a software craftsman and is convinced that we can create a better world for people with better software. His life's purpose is to deliver and help developers worldwide to deliver better software faster and safely—and he can even call that a job!

Marius Bogoevici

Red Hat

Marius Bogoevici

principal specialist solution architect, Red Hat

10:15–11:00 a.m.

Marius is a principal specialist solution architect at Red Hat, acting as trusted advisor to customers on solutions that include Red Hat products, consulting services, and training. Marius has a long-standing interest in enterprise application integration, event-driven microservices, and data streaming.

Before joining Red Hat, Marius led Spring Cloud Stream as part of the Spring team at Pivotal, and contributed to various projects in the Spring portfolio, including Spring Cloud Data Flow, Spring Integration and Spring Kafka. He is the co-author of "Spring Integration in Action" (Manning, 2012).

Chris Van Tuin

Red Hat

Chris Van Tuin

chief technologist, NA West, Red Hat

9:15–10:00 a.m.

Chris has over 20 years of experience in IT and Software. Since joining Red Hat in 2005, Chris has been architecting solutions for strategic customers and partners and is a frequent speaker on DevOps, security, and containers. He started his career at Intel in IT and managed hosting followed by leadership roles in services and sales engineering at Loudcloud and Linux startups. Chris holds a Bachelors of Electrical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Hugh McKee

Lightbend

Hugh McKee

developer advocate, Lightbend

1:00–1:45 p.m.

Hugh McKee is a developer advocate at Lightbend. He has had a long career building applications that evolved slowly, that inefficiently utilized their infrastructure, were brittle, and prone to failure. That all changed when he started building reactive, asynchronous, actor-based systems. This radically new way of building applications rocked his world. As an added benefit, building application systems became way more fun than it had ever been. Now he is focused on helping others to discover the significant advantages and joys of building responsive, resilient, elastic, message-driven applications.

Ram Maddali

Red Hat

Ram Maddali

senior solutions architect, Red Hat

3:00–3:45 p.m.

Ram Maddali is a senior solutions architect for AppDev. He is an open source enthusiast with over 14 years of building robust and scalable enterprise applications and has been involved in application modernization with many customers. Ram began his career with IBM and joined Red Hat 4 years ago. Since joining Red Hat, Ram has helped customers in transportation, retail, logistics, and financial services implement solutions using open source technologies successfully.