Red Hat global preferences

Red Hat Blog

Open Your World Looks at Music, Strategic Planning and Community Building

This is our third and final blog highlighting sessions from the Open Your World forum presented by opensource.com. Three sessions are outlined below and cover a wide range of topics from music and Creative Commons to strategic planning – all focused on the application of open source principles. Check out our first recap covering sessions on healthcare and business and our second recap on government and law sessions.

Three individuals with different musical backgrounds collaborated to discuss Creative Commons and the application of open source within the music industry. Daniel James, director of 64 studio, kicked off the discussion with commentary on the use of closed source tools such as Protools and Autotune and how many artists (including some who have profited from the use of Autotune) are calling for the music industry to stop using these tools. Curt Smith, co-founder of Tears For Fears, and musician Brad Sucks followed with a discussion on the Creative Commons licensing model. Read the full article here and listen to the session here.

Karsten Wade, lead author of “The Open Source Way,” explained how to use the handbook on useful principles and how-to information for applying the open source way across domains of expertise. The entire book is self-referential, in that the open source way is followed in everything from how it is written to who writes it. It is written by a community of experts, but has plenty of room for help at all levels. Read the full article here and listen to the session here.

Eugene Eric Kim, co-founder and principle at Blue Oxen Associates, has worked extensively with the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit dedicated to bringing free content to the world. Kim and his team help the foundation articulate where it is today, where it wants to go in the future, and how best to get there. Read more about Kim’s work with Wikimedia Foundation here and listen to the session here.

Want to contribute to opensource.com? Read more about how to participate here. You can also follow @opensourceway on Twitter and identi.ca.