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Aside from our logo, Red Hat® red is our most recognizable brand asset. Our core colors–red, black, and white–are in the Red Hat logo and are most closely associated with our brand. We use them to make a big impression. Every project starts with our core colors.

Start with our core color palette

Red Hat red
#EE0000
R 238 G 0 B 0
C 0 M 98 Y 85 K 0
PMS  1788

White
#FFFFFF
R 255 G 255 B 255
C 0 M 0 Y 0 K 0
 White

Black
#000000
R 0 G 0 B 0
C 60 M 40 Y 40 K 100
 Rich Black

Red is a strong color. Instead of filling a space with red, we use pops of red on a white, black, or gray background with a simple layout and plenty of white space to make it feel more open and approachable. It can be just as impactful as filling a space with red.

Hello world campaign image for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 with lots of white space

Use a white or neutral background that is open and not cluttered with too many design elements. Spacious and open designs help the most important elements of our message stand out.

Illustration of two women working drawn in the Red Hat core colors

Red Hat red is one of our most recognizable brand assets. Always use Red Hat red as the main accent in your color palette to make sure your design looks and feels like Red Hat.

Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform social media image using mostly black with white a red accents

Do this

Use a neutral background with pops of red and plenty of white space.

Social media image using all red with small accents of black and white

Do not do this

Red is a strong color. Try using a neutral background before filling a space with Red Hat red.

Example of a presentation slide that uses Red Hat red for the accent color

Do this

Use Red Hat red as the main accent color.

Example of a presentation slide that uses light red for the accent color

Do not do this

Do not use a tint or shade of red as the main accent color.

Add colors from our extended color wheel

When we need to move beyond red to communicate a certain tone or tell a specific story, we can either leverage a common color palette or we can create a new palette made up of colors from the Red Hat extended color wheel.

Choose a common color palette

Palette 1

Example color palette using Red Hat red with neutrals

Palette 2

Example color palette using Red Hat red with tints and shades of purple and teal

Palette 3

Example color palette using Red Hat red with tints and shades of orange and indigo

Palette 4

Example color palette using Red Hat red with tints and shades of purple and indigo

Create a palette from our color wheel

Our extended color wheel starts with Red Hat red and adds 9 additional colors, from orange to purple. You can use darker or lighter shades of any of these colors. For ease of use, we have provided the color values for 1 to 3 tints and shades of each color.

 

Saturated colors

Use no more than 2 of these colors in addition to red.

Shades (dark colors)

Use these as neutrals or to add shadow, not as dominant colors.

Tints (light colors)

Use these in diagrams and spreadsheets to add highlights.

Even when we’re adding colors from our color wheel, our work should always look and feel like Red Hat. Start with the following principles:

Illustration of a woman at a computer, surrounded by orange empty space and the Red Hat logo
Lead with white space

White space isn’t always white. Use an open background with a simple layout that is not cluttered with too many design elements.

Red Hat Marketplace social image using mostly light blues with red accents
Use red as the main accent

Red Hat red should be used in every palette. We can use red to create hierarchy and balance within the composition.

Graphs using Red Hat red and tints and shades of blue
Use no more than 2 saturated colors

To create a palette that feels like Red Hat, avoid adding more than 2 saturated colors beyond Red Hat red. More saturated colors can feel chaotic or silly.

Illustration using dark purple and blues as the main colors with red as an accent
Use blue and purple thoughtfully

Purple and blue could unintentionally symbolize our relationship with IBM. When you use them, be mindful that the Red Hat brand should always be independent.

Example image showing boxes of red, blue, orange, and teal with white or black boxes on top

Do this

Use colors that work together and have good contrast.

Example image showing boxes of red, blue, orange, and teal with similarly intense colors on top, creating vibration

Do not do this

Do not use colors together that vibrate or have low contrast.

Example of an illustration using a tints and shades of blue and orange with pops of red

Do this

When using limited colors, use red as the main accent with tints and shades to create balance and hierarchy.

Illustration using a lot of dark orange and blue, overwhelming Red Hat red

Do not do this

Avoid using three saturated colors in a limited color palette.

Color across different applications

Our work should always look and feel like Red Hat, even when we are using colors other than red. Follow these best practices to ensure that whatever you’re creating uses color in a way that helps convey the message correctly and in a way that’s easy to understand.

Presentation slide showing the available color palettes in the Red Hat presentation template
Color in presentations

Whether distributed internally or externally, presentations should always feel like Red Hat. Use the presentation template, which uses our core colors and includes guidelines for using the extended color palette. Follow those guidelines for more on adding color to presentation elements like graphs and diagrams.

Illustration of buildings and apps using teal, purple, and red
Color in illustrations

Illustrations can tell a story in a way that photography and icons cannot. We use illustrations to tell conceptual stories or describe nuanced ideas. Using a core color palette with red as an accent ensures that illustrations still look like Red Hat, but using an extended palette can help create the right tone for the story.

Examples of text with different levels of contrast on neutral backgrounds
Color for accessibility

When designing for digital or print, consider color contrast and accessibility. Color that is too light or dark may obscure crucial information like text, warnings, and other informational elements. To test your design for maximum visibility, use an application like Color Oracle that shows you what different colors look like to people with visual impairments.

Various user interface elements in different colors and scales
Color in user experience

Across our web properties and other interfaces, we’re mindful of how we use color for consistency and ease of use. We’ve chosen specific colors and palettes that maximize visibility on screen while staying true to our brand color palette.

Photo of two notebooks and a t-shirt using Red Hat colors and brand elements
Color in swag

Branded merchandise, also known as swag, is more than just pens and T-shirts. We use swag to engage our audience in our brand experience and to increase brand impressions, so start with our core color palette. If you use other colors, be consistent with what your program or group is using in other applications.

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